17 – Roars

Below the last video are links to other bloggers posting about waves and roars

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

From the balcony, the sound of the waves is less rhythmic than when walking along the shoreline. Yet, I still hear a stereo effect of moving from one ear to the next. The sound is like a constant hum containing fluctuations as I hear an accumulation of many simultaneous actions. Nonetheless, the sound of the ocean from the balcony across the beach is soothing.

Photo by Emiliano Arano on Pexels.com

As I walk near the water’s edge, the sound is different. Although the waves are still constant and repetitive, the sound is more intense and detailed. However, each day is different. From the calm days to the stormy waves of anger, the waters speak in different tones as if they were different languages – but It speaks across the languages to all people.

We commonly refer to the sound of the waves as a roar – but it’s not the same roar as a lion or tiger. While those are sounds of power and might, the lion follows the roar with silence – but the sea does not.

The waves coming ashore roar – but it is not the same as the roar of a sporting event crowd. While both provide a constant as background, the crowd’s excitement is not a predictable rhythm. The crowd’s roar is for the unexpected good.

The waves coming ashore roar – but it is not the same as the roars of laughter caused by a comedian. Those are sounds of joy and approval – but not even close to the consistency of the sea – which can also bring joy.

Photo by Ben Mack on Pexels.com

The waves coming ashore roar – but it is not the same as the roar of a jet engine. Yes, the jet engine starts as a loud roar then fades away as it moves down the runway – but it is more gradual than the roar of the sea. Sometimes when I walk, I hear jets roar across the sky, then look upward to find it. Other times the sea mimics the flight, and then I look upward to find nothing.

The waves coming ashore roar – but maybe the roar of thunder is the best analogy. Thunder rolls across the sky like the roar of the waves roll across the beach. Just like the waves, thunder loudly claps to announce its nearby presence. The wave’s thunderous clap also announces that water is coming my way – sometimes splashing me – but always touching my feet.

The waves coming ashore roar. Not as a crowd, lion, or a jet engine – but as itself. Once that sound is in your ear, it’s unforgettable.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The waves coming ashore roar. I love the beach, but the roar also declares a sense of power. A power that should be respected. A power that should be feared.

The waves coming ashore roar – but the rushing water is not meant to symbolize racing through life because this sound is a respite from the hectic, frantic pace of daily life. These roars are sounds of peace, calm, and solitude that is this place.

The roar of the waters at the beach are mainly relaxing, serene, and reliable. This sound is one of nature’s most recognizable white noises. This sound is timeless because the sea is unaffected by time. It keeps up with time. The sea does not age – it just continues to come ashore.

People tend to gravitate to certainty – and these roars are certain. They also carry a sense of freedom – a freedom that comes with being a snowbird at the beach. A time I like walking on the beach – a time that is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

See what other bloggers have posted about waves and roars

Next walk: Moon – Saturday 5th December @ 1 AM (Eastern US)

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111 thoughts on “17 – Roars”

  1. Nice description, Frank. Bravo!
    The variations of the sound of plane or a train than goes towards us on then goes away is due to the effect Doppler Fizeau while despite of the appearances tides are not speed. The up and down of the waves is source of music and so for sack and resack.
    In friendship
    Michel

    Liked by 2 people

  2. With only a few exceptions we have tent camped in Michigan every summer for the last 40+ years. The sound of the waves at night is a familiar and comforting sound and one I try to pull up from memory when I am having trouble sleeping.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I see Marina has already mentioned hearing the sound of waves roaring at night, which is something I remember from my teenage years. Living across the road from the beach with my parents for a few weeks while they awaited the construction of our new home was particularly memorable. It was winter, but most nights I kept the window of my bedroom slightly open to hear the magical roaring sounds. I love that you likened the roar of waves to the roar of thunder, both sounds of nature – both roars emanating from a powerful source that must be respected. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Joanne,
      Yes indeed – the roar of waves is from a powerful source – just as trains and jet engines are powerful. Yet – we don’t have to step that far away for that power to become something soothing. Ahhhh …. Although only for a short time, living near a beach as a teenager must have been a thrill. Too bad it was during winter. Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It always amazes me how the roar of the ocean is stirring and calming at once. It seems like a reminder to have a healthy respect for the power the sea holds. It can be frightening during storms but so peaceful most of the time. I like your comparison of thunder claps and wave splashes, rolling thunder and resonating waves.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Barbara,
      “Stirring and calming at once” …. now that statement, a contradiction, is a perfect addition to this walk. It hold much more power than we think – and yes – when it raises a fuss, we see a touch of it. When you mentioned the thunderous claps of waves I chuckled because of those infrequent occasions when they startle me.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Margaret,
      First of all, thanks for noting the sound of the receding water because that is a sound that I also enjoy. Love your reference of the “clatter and tinkle of the shells …”. 🙂 “it puts me in my place” … oh my, another good one. To me, that’s also a subtle reference to the power it holds and our respect for that power. Oh well … just a thought.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Absolutely one of my favorite sounds – and so perfect to fall asleep to. Every year we go to Maine in late September or early October and stay on the water in Ogunquit or York Harbor. Oceanside room is a must and as much fun as we have exploring and walking during the day, our favorite time is the nights listening to the waves which gently lull us to sleep. Your description is perfect!

    Pam

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Frank, I whole-hardheartedly agree: once the sound of the ocean is in your ear, it’s unforgettable! I like your description today. I’ve never thought too much about the ‘roar’ of the waves, but now that you’ve mentioned it, it’s very unlike the roar of a crowd or a jet or a wild cat. I wonder if languages other than English have a special word for ocean roar. Probably they do. It’s distinctive and memorable, that’s for sure!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Rishika,
      Welcome first-time beach walker. Not only thanks for joining us, but also thank you for the kind words. Your words made me smile because those are some of the things I try to do on all the walks – describing details and intricacies – capturing beauty – and yes, as if everyone was walking on the beach. The beginning video is something that some readers enjoy to help with that sense of being there. So thank you!!!! … and I hope you return. A question – How did you find out about this little corner of the world I occupy?

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Thanks for letting me know. At least you are one of the observant ones. You would be surprised the number of followers my old blog has added since the closing post in February … and yes, even about the post announcing the new blog. I laugh each time I get a new follower notification.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. I always hear the roar as controlled power. There is a pattern to the waves that I find soothing, comforting. It can be whipped into a fury but it always seems controlled, unapologetic. It follows it’s destiny.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I like “stirring and calming”–I think that describes the ocean in general. I love the sound, as well.
    Quite a list of roaring things–though not surprising to a writer. 😏 Still, you made me curious about its etymology, and it seems its original use was to describe human bellowing and/or laments.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Between your video and the song video, I was wowing out loud and felt such FREEDOM (been using that word a lot lately here!). I’m also grinning as I stretched my arms out imagining what it feels like to surf. Oh the sun and the water and the waves and the sand and the winds ….. what JOY and how powerful! Your video, Frank, had me thinking “how small we are and how we must respect Mother in all ways.” When I lived in Fla. I used to go down to a beach, sit on a huge boulder as I watched the waves come crashing in when it was really windy. Oh the sense of pure power I still feel that today. Thank you so much for this post!! xo

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Amy,
      The video here is a bit different than the others I’ve used. When I found it, I knew it had a place – well, as long as I found it. But with “freedom” being mentioned in the closing – and the relationship between roars and waves – I knew this video was a good fit with this post.

      I’ve also thought about “how small we are” … not only on this planet, but in the universe as a whole. We are pinheads on a place that is a mere speck of dust in the universe. To me, that makes what we have grander.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Incredible response to my “how small we are”. That in a nutshell within your words is the key of success to humility. Our lives are magical as well if we could just get out of the mundane to see how vast and huge this universe is within another universe and any sense of “Oh I’m just hot stuff” SHOULD melt away. I’ve had many conversations regarding who I am on my walks with Mother. Most of those conversations I’ve kept to myself.

        Like

  10. What I like most about water, rivers especially, is what you mentioned straight away – each day is different. In fact, each moment, each wave, each ripple is different. I find water has a calming effect on me, because I realize that there’s more to come.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dan,
      Water affects us – and in my opinion, moving water has a great effect – but that’s only my opinion. You mentioned rivers. I grew up in a town on the Ohio River – and just watching the water flow by is something people along a river do! … and cheers to your statement about waves. Waves may come in a repetitive pattern, but no question that each is different.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I have always thought that the ocean is speaking directly to us. We come from the ocean and feel the call of an ancient voice. One of my favourite quotes (and you already know how much I love quotes) is by Hermann Broch: “Those who live by the sea can hardly form a single thought of which the sea would not be part.”

    Liked by 1 person

  12. The first sentence itself struck a realization for me – how the waves sound a different rhythm than when at the shoreline. I imagined how true that was! The video at the beginning so gorgeous, I enjoyed the enormous waves before I started reading 🙂 I enjoyed how you brought out the polarity of how the rushing water of the waves themselves have an unrushed quality to them, conveying a sense of calm, solitude to us. So true the waves roar and yet they are soothing. They keep returning giving us a timeless experience. The ocean sounds as if don’t allow any mind chatter in me, continually clearing my inner ground, leaving me refreshed fully.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. PD,
      Glad that the intro struck a thought with you. After all, that what introductions are supposed to – and sometimes I get lucky. Thanks. I like the way you used “polarity” after different aspects of water. that seem to be opposite – even contradictory.. Barbara used “stirring and calming” … I love that. … and now add your “polarity” to the thoughts that I think should be noted as important thoughts. Thank you!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I like how you try to describe the roar that the surf makes. Yes, kind of like thunder. But definitely announcing its Presence. You always make me think when I read your pieces. It’s like breaking down the beach-walking experience to many perceptions. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. It’s interesting how the roar of those crashing waves goes hushed when you jump into the water and swim out a little. The roar gets left behind and yet, now you’re directly in the embrace of its power. It’s more serene, yes, but it’s also something to be respected, as I’ve learned a few times over.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Frank,
    I’ve often wondered what it must be like to live right next to a rocky shore where the waves crash and roar most days. I read a fabulous book by a fellow blogger about a woman who lives in a lighthouse and there must be something so special to living next to it. And learning when to leave because high tide comes in you are no longer safe, Wild.
    And you will never disappoint with the addition of a Jack Johnson video… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      The crashing against the rocks and the cliffs is different. At least the beach allows a smooth transition that is soothing. The life you described in the lighthouse does sound wild. Another paradox of serenity and alertness. Glad you enjoyed the Jack Johnson video. I had this one tagged for a long time, then thought it fit well with my use of freedom in the closing paragraph.

      Like

  16. I adore the roar of the sea/ocean. It lulls me to sleep. Yet, it keeps others awake.
    Even on the lake near me, Lake Ontario, there is a sound…. a mini roar. Certainly it’s not the boisterous voice of an ocean, nor sea, yet it drowns out the highway, the freeway and the busy railway tracks that trace the beach, and have cut the lake off from we the people.
    How this happened is both a story of progress, and corruption.
    Nonetheless, no matter how LOUD the sounds of vehicular traffic and rail traffic, on the beach there is a quiet peace.
    It’s kind of crazy, Frank, it’s like one voice negating another, as they each attempt to out loud the other.
    Well, I hope I have expressed my thoughts.
    The beach I speak of has lovely sand, and I do enjoy the refreshing feeling of my feet sinking into it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Resa,
      I’m sure you are one of many who love the wave sounds to lure you to sleep. You mentioned Lake Ontario. Sure, those waves aren’t as powerful as the waves of the ocean – but they too can kick up a fuss! I’m with you in terms of the ability of wave sounds to block out the surrounding sounds of humanity. Amazing and impressive. Thanks for sharing!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Cheryl,
      Compare and contrast, paradoxes, contradictions, and others – Yes – I think they all fit with this post. Barbara’s description of stirring and calm resonates with me. Still, ahhhhhh … to the sound of waves. The past few years I go to the beach to walk and watch the sunrise on my birthday. It’s so calm and peaceful at that time, so I enjoy it very much! Thanks for sharing …. ahhhhhh …

      Liked by 1 person

  17. The sounds of water are quite varied, aren’t they? Waves can roar or lull, agitate or calm. Rain can be soothing or terrifying if in a bad storm. The sounds of a stream or river are lovely, but if in flood, they’re the sounds of destruction.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet,
      While I focused this walk on the roars of waves, you conceptual thought about the wide-range of sounds of water is wonderful – and to end it with sounds of destruction – wow – and that can also apply to waves when you think hurricanes. Oh boy – it’s getting complex. 😉 Thanks, Janet!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Debbie,
      Welcome first-time beach walker. Cheers to another connection through Jo, the good lady in Portugal. I’m with you because I don’t get to walk the beach as often as I would like. I’m actually very inland – a 14-hour drive to the beach – but when we go, we go for many weeks. This tells the story and how this series came to be. https://beachwalkreflections.wordpress.com/2020/10/20/1-introducing/ … hope you return for another walk.

      Like

  18. Good Tuesday Afternoon aFrank,
    The sounds of the waves were a wonderful reminder of those nights with the open balcony doors to our suite on our cruises. It’s a mesmerizing sound I’m engulfed by on every vacation. Sadly, no more for a big amount of time. I pray I can manage future cruises. If too much time passes I may not have the strength to ballroom dance. The bones they are a-aching. LOL
    My friend lives on the beach. I visit her for the sound and scent of the ocean. Her home is a very nice substitute.
    Hope you’re doing well and enjoying this new venue you’ve created. Have a wonderful week … Be Safe!!!
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Isadora,
      You know all too well the impact of the sounds of the waves and the sea – those sounds that can lead us into a trance. You are lucky to have a friend so close to you. After all, I have to drive 14 hours to hear that sound!

      Be patient about future cruising. We miss it too – as well as ballroom dance. But the time will come when they return. Continuing staying safe!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Dude! I LOVE Jack Johnson he is total beach vibe. What a great video to match any beach walk. The roar at the beginning gives me such peach while I’m relaxing on the sand watching them crash and hearing the waves is such a Zen feeling but I imagine when paddle boarding the roar is less welcoming 🙂 but I like the comparison of different ocean roars and how they have their own language. That’s a pretty cool thing I hadn’t thought of that. 🙂

    Like

  20. It was nice to listen to the waves as I read. I love the ocean and will miss it here in AZ. So I’ll catch up with the sounds and visions of the sea on your blog. Loved both videos. Sometimes I don’t take the time to listen to all the videos, so thanks for not putting tons of them on your post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha,
      Thanks for the kind words. The opening video is for those who want the waves sounds as background. The closing video is something I take pride in providing because I want it to feel part of the post in some way. For the visuals, I use occasionally use my photos, frequently use pexels.com via WordPress, and I’ve been collaborating with photographers (those are full size).

      Thank you for the dates & topics you posted. When applicable, I try to plan accordingly. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s awesome, Frank. Let me know which ones, so I can let people know ahead of time. Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed your videos and they inspired me to put some in my post for Wednesday and to add a few videos to my sidebar. It gave me at least an hour of searching fun. 🙂

        Like

    1. Bacardi,
      The fact that you stepped back in time here to read a past post made me smile. Thank you for that. One of my favorites is Horizon, but I can’t recall the number. Meanwhile, that is a big seasonal difference you mentioned. Thanks for sharing.

      Like

      1. We are always visited by typhoons …and it’s always damaging to the poor people…Sometimes I want to read old posts just for the sake of reading. No particular reason. I only followed some bloggers who are reading my old posts instead of the new ones. The pictures you used are great. I like most the sunset……Thank you so much, Frank…Stay safe !

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I take pride with the images on my posts. I typically use images from Pexels, and sometimes my own. My Saturday posts have been collaborations featuring photos of others, which is something I hope expands. Meanwhile, natural events as typhons, hurricanes, tornados, tsunamis, and many fires are devastating to many people – byt yes, more so to the poor.

          Liked by 1 person

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