67 – Food *

Special thanks to Dale for providing the photos – especially for doing this on short notice. Dale is in Canada and I encourage readers to visit her eclectic blog A Delectable Life. Please tell her I sent you and feel free to comment on her images here. Dale’s photos are copyrighted by Dale Rogerson.

This walk is also answering Marsha’s Writer’s Quotes Wednesday Writing Challenge about Nutrition.

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Looking across the water is a reminder that life lives below the surface. A large variety of fish, shrimp, clams, oysters, scallops, and more. Of course, the listed ones are commonly available food for us to eat. So I wonder, “What’s for dinner?”

Is this an ongoing question for you? We ask it, but also laugh about this seemingly eternal question. Although our time at the beach is away from the normal routine of home, “What’s for dinner?” ever looms in our midst. So, why not, I’ll think about food today.

All of us have a variety of likes and dislikes. Some of us are risk-takers when it comes to trying different foods, others have a limited menu of preferences. So food: What is it? Why do we need it? When it comes to food, what do living things have in common with each other?

Food – that basic need for all life forms. All the organisms of the sea and the beach need food for the same reasons as people – for nourishment – for the nutrients that either provide energy, act as a building block or assists in a process. Yes – that’s what carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals are all about.

Food – think of all the cookbooks available – let alone online resources of recipes – all forming a collective of bountiful offerings of culinary delights. Yet, most people limit themselves to a rotation of fewer than 20 recipes.

Food – Think of the times of our settlers when most ingredients were grown in their own gardens or by other locals. The farmer’s markets of today carry on the tradition of locally grown products, which also seems to carry greater importance outside North America.

I think of today’s large grocery stores – endless aisles of canned and packaged products that are complete with preservatives, fat, sodium, sugar, and more. Therefore, much of today’s cooking is an act of combining various boxes and cans into a final product.

On the other hand, the food industry today provides fresh fruits and vegetables from throughout the world – a luxury less available during my youth – oranges from South Africa – grapes from Chile – after all, bananas are not grown everywhere.

I think of a time when families ate an evening meal together – and even a more grand meal on Sunday afternoon – whereas today our lives are more on-the-run causing us to yield our food preferences to frozen and packaged products or a wide variety of fast-food establishments.

Today’s life offers many restaurants of a variety of styles and prices without a messy kitchen – well, at least not ours. I find it interesting how cuisines differ not only from country to country, but also from region to region within a country. The fried plate of everything and anything is more common in the USA South and the USA North. The dishes of northern Italy are different from those of the south.

For humanity, food is more something elementary to our existence. Food is a sign of everyday life and culture that identifies people. Food is one of life’s pleasures through the collective of scents, textures, flavors, and colors – something more than a necessity to keep us alive.

I think of the abundance of natural food in nature – the corn with its husk but without a label because corn is corn. Let us not forget that corn is a plant – a living thing that also needs food just like we do and for the same reasons. Green plants make their own food by photosynthesis because they can’t catch it or kill it. Animals hunt for food because (and unlike the green plants) they can’t make their own. Whether an organism catches food or makes its own, food’s end result is the same.

Light from the sun is the initial energy source driving photosynthesis, but there are also organisms living in the darkness of the deep sea that can make their own food without the presence of light – but they use the sulfur gases venting into the water from Earth’s core as the energy driving their food production process. Nature’s design is so grand.

Food is a deep subject and more complex than many realize. Everyone has an opinion about food – after all, look at the number of cookbooks, diet books, and diets available – let alone entire television networks dedicated to food.

Thinking about food makes me hungry. Besides, it’s lunchtime. But for now, I continue moving toward the condo because walking the beach is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

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155 thoughts on “67 – Food *”

  1. Great photos of beautiful food……..there’s food for the tummy but also food for the soul and food for the mind…..it ALL matters and it ALL satisfies us in different ways. One thing they have in common is they leave us wanting MORE! Great post Frank.

    Pam

    Liked by 3 people

  2. A fun post with great photos by Dale. Dale and I cook in the same way–what do we have in the refrigerator or pantry, and what can I do with it? 😀
    I’m fascinated by food history and traditions within families/cultures.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Merril,
      Cheers to your creative cooking style. Just as you don’t know where the words are going to take you in a poem, food preparation is a similar endeavor. Food definitely has a lot of history – and its relationship with culture? Oh boy – very strong! Glad you enjoyed Dale’s wonderful pics.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Food is a necessity for life, all life but it is also a soothing balm that brings us together and forces us apart. Taste, texture, aroma all of these are integral to the senses and part of the food experience. It is difficult living in a country that has such an abundance of riches of food to know that there are those that have a little or nothing. I watch cooking shows and I’m fascinated by other cultures and I am sad that there are those who scramble just to survive. This world has so much and it has such a difficult time sharing that wealth. That makes me sad.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Thanks for the topic thoughts and photos by Dale. Look at all that beautiful food our planet grew! Happy Earth Day!
    I never liked the connotation of ‘diets’. Random thought: I’ve wondered if we shouldn’t change the name ‘food’ to ‘human fuel’ – would people have a better idea which grades of human fuel help their bodies run healthy – like we do for our vehicle engines? My motorcycle tank does not hold the same kind of fuel or as much as a semi-truck.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Rose,
      Thanks for the wonderful comment. Human Fuel instead of food? I like it because that’s what it is, well … plus a bit more. Nonetheless, your thought fits well with this walk. Oh … and true …. yes, this fits well with Earth Day – but unplanned. Cheers to an accidental serendipitous moment. Glad you enjoyed Dale’s pics and Happy Earth Day to you!

      Like

    1. Laurie,
      As a fellow music lover, you’ll love this tidbit. We were hosting a dinner group one evening. Although I can’t recall the theme, I went to Spotify and made a playlist of songs having a food in the title … such as Bananas Pancakes. My memory is thinking that Fruit was our theme – but I’m not sure. Meanwhile, happy you enjoyed Dale’s tasty photos and this walk down Culinary Lane.

      Like

  5. Unser Angebot an Lebensmitteln war noch nie so umfangreich wie heute. Während des ganzen Jahres haben Sie die Möglichkeit zu kaufen, wie wir uns fühlen. Die Qualität ist aber sehr unterschiedlich. Zum Beispiel kann man in den Wintermonaten wirklich nicht viel von Erdbeeren erwarten …

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rudi,
      First of all, I hope the translation tool got this right.

      Our range of food has never been as extensive as it is today. Throughout the year you have the opportunity to buy how we feel. However, the quality is very different. For example, you really can’t expect much from strawberries in the winter months …

      Great point about the extensiveness of food today. Between improved farming, transportation, and people moving around, many culinary treats are at our disposal. I agree – off-season fruits are only a substitute, but with lower expectations. Thanks for sharing.

      Like

      1. A ha ha… well, I do like to eat but not fussy about it. Simplicity is key (not always as easy as it sounds though being vegan)! 🤣🤣 As for cooking, eventhough I like it, by the time get home, I just have no energy left! You also might be surprised to hear, I rarely drink. Just on occasions… like this one! Clink! 😉

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Vegan… that explains it 😉
          I know what you mean about by the time you get home. Having returned to a 8:30-5:00 job has hindered my creativity! Mind you, working from home, it’s a bit easier!

          Like

  6. Most folks only rotate among 20 recipes?? That surprises me, Frank — not that I’m a big experimenter when it comes to food but that, with all the recipes available online, in cookbooks, on TV, and so on, somebody certainly is! Lovely photos, Dale — and how nice that your subjects aren’t concerned with touching up their makeup and hair, ha!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Debbie,
      Twenty or so is enough for a rotation of several weeks. All those cookbooks that occupying shelves and boxes doing nothing more than occupying space while waiting for the special occasion. Remember bookstores? Think about all the cookbooks there! Internet access is amazing – so I wonder how many printed untouched recipes exist in a personal file – let alone the recipes we cut out from a publication. Meanwhile, I guarantee I won’t post a beach walk about makeup.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Ah Frank,
    Lovely to collaborate with you on this post. Food is the great gatherer or assembler. I truly pity the people who get no enjoyment out of food – and I know some! (They are never invited to my house.) They eat purely to survive and have no appreciation for flavours or textures, scents or tastes. I’ll never understand them.
    I show my love for my people by cooking for them. We nurture with food and the company kept during the sharing of it. How can we be at war when we are breaking bread? Impossible, I say! Okay, okay… family dynamics aside… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      Not only is your passion for food and cooking evident, you also use it as an expression of love, thanks, appreciation, and more. I like your line – “Food is the great gatherer or assembler.” So true, and you use it that way. Cheers to your efforts and belief system … and thank you again for no only sharing your photos, but for doing so on short notice. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. So glad it shines through, Frank. It really is, isn’t it? Have a dinner party – doesn’t have to be fancy, but it can, as well – and gather your loved ones around. The best. For me, anyway. I’m very glad I did participate!

        Like

  8. I appear to be lucky, Frank. I made it here shortly after dinner. I’m good, but Dale’s photos are making me think that maybe I should have had a second helping. Making me think about food usually has that effect. Nicely done.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Great post Frank satisfying our hunger and for movement and nourishment. We still come together every night and late as it is enjoy a dinner together with the cleaning of pots and pans and a messy kitchen. This reminds me I’ve gotta get the plants in the ground! Great picutures Dale took!
    💖

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Cindy,

      Glad you enjoyed Dale’s photos and my musings. Food is so much of life, that it was easy to think about. You made me laugh because whoever cooks here, the other cleans. Unfortunately for me, my wife generally leaves a more messy kitchen than I. BTW – Hope your plantings are going well. Cincinnati just received a blast of cold, which is why prevailing wisdom here is don’t plant until after Mother’s Day

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I sure did! I so agree. I hope your wife doesn’t burn something nightly like me or you’d have it worse. Ask my son who is the dishwasher these days… lol.
        Oh hope you get to warm up soon and send some rain. I’m getting to that this weekend.. I’ll let you know. Smart for you to wait on the planting! 💖🌷

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Enjoyed your ruminations on the delectations of food. And Dale’s yummy photos, too!

    I do try to continually expand my repertoire, but I’ve saved many recipes and books full of them I’ve never tried. Maybe one year it will become a bigger priority. I do cook based on what’s in the fridge and soon to go bad!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. A tantalizing post, Frank!
    Dale’s pics are fabulous. As a veggie, I’m always happy to see a focus on fresh fruits and vegetables.
    Thunder! Did you make all of the prepared dishes? I know you can cook from your blog and Sorryless blog.
    Frank, I believe I’ve mentioned this before, but the idea of “the food chain” freaks me out.
    Still a lot of reflections to ruminate over on this beach walk.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, my friend.
      You know I did, Sorceress! I am not a veggie but I do prepare a lot of veggie meals, just because. (Something tells me when the boys move out, I will make even more as there will be no complaints 😉 )

      Like

    2. Resa,
      Tantalizing is a good word for this post – and especially Dale’s images. I tried to deliver a broad perspective about food with hopes of helping others to make connections – but yes – I recall thoughts of the food chain make you uncomfortable. Please remember that I have a biology background. A toast to the good things you found in this walk. Clink.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Frank, I had plenty to eat today – all eating out, but your lovely post made me think about tomorrow and what we will eat. My refrigerator is full but the green veggies are lacking. I thought it was interesting that we limit ourselves to about 20 meals. That’s so true, and I may be a lot less than that for us. When COVID hit, Vince and I started experimenting with online recipes. We have expanded ourselves somewhat. Living with Cindy for a couple of months made a few changes. And not having our regular restaurants, made another change. Still, so limited! Great post, Frank. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha,
      Glad this post served as a reflection point for yourself. That in itself makes me smile – let alone that you told me. When I first started watching Food Network, I watched with joy and anticipation – and when I watched something to seemed good to me, I printed that recipe with hopes of trying it – and many times I did. Truly a wonderful experience. I know we have cut out many recipes from magazines, so there are times we simply say let’s try something new. So I encourage you to continue exploring and experimenting. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You bet. I turned an old lunch favorite as a kid into a seldom tried recipe today for ham salad, my brother’s favorite of my mom’s. Now my husband loves it. I never made it much in the past. So a nice change of pace.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. I’m always thinking about what I’m going to cook for dinner while on my daily walks, and whether I need to head to the grocery store on the way back! I sometimes wonder about what food must have been like before the “discovery” of the Americas. So many of the foods we now take for granted originally derive from there, such as tomatoes, maize, potatoes, chillies, capsicum, various nuts and beans, etc

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Food! Glorious food!

    That’s all I know of the song. But what I DO know of food, is that to really understand what it’s all about, you need to have celebrated the stuff. It can’t be a menial task, or a chore, or a drive-thru dynamic . . nope. It has to be something you painted. You and your co-host did a fantastic job of highlighting that point.

    You’se two should do more of this kind of thing. Just saying . . .

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marco,
      Agree … food is much more than a drive-thru and a sequence of insert, chew, then swallow. Food in itself can make the event special. Dale’s photos are wonderful. She sent me many, and I went – what the heck – use them all – plus I gave me a chance to examine a different look.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. When it gets to that point, it’s time to put down the fork and analyze your diet. That’s my two cents on it anyways. It ain’t healthy to eat that way, bad things happen. I know it.

        She’s got quite a gallery.

        Liked by 2 people

  15. I have several chefs and true “foodies” in my family, and I’m always intrigued with how much more adventurous they are with food than I am. I eat well, but very simply, particularly by comparison. I am very well aware that it is a huge privilege that we can be so particular with our tastes. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debra,
      I find it interesting meeting people who deal with foodies in their family. Here’s the most adventurous encounter I’ve seen. We took a friend and his wife to a Thai restaurant in my area. He didn’t look at the menu, then told the server, “Bring me something authentic. The server asked a few questions – and he received a meal he enjoyed.

      Like

  16. Colorful variety of foods photographed by Dale. Bravo for creating a feast for the eyes.
    Food and I have a love hate relationship now. I used to cook up a storm for years. I had
    big Sunday family dinners and delighted in creating something new everyday for my hubby and kids..
    Every recipe I was taught as a child on latin cuisine, every Martha Stewart cook book I could purchase,
    every tv show on foods and desserts, and of course a few libations to accompany my masterpieces.
    I was a master at it. Then, food allergies started. I eat to sustain health. There’s no joy anymore. I have
    to think about every morsel that enters my mouth. No fun … but, I do enjoy watching others have a great time consuming meals. Sorry … about the length of this comment.
    Happy Eating …
    Be Safe 😷 … Isadora 😎

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Back Roads,
      Welcome first-time commenter to my personal sandy beach. Thanks for taking the time and interest to comment. There is so much to say about food – so at least I tried. In the future, I will have one on cooking – but one is still in draft form. Meanwhile, Dale provided delightful photos for this walk. (I frequently collaborate in order to use the photography of others. FYI: This is walk #67 – and yesterday I posted #73 …. so I invite you to read past walks. Is this Tony or Margie?

      Liked by 2 people

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