76 – Windows *

Special thanks to Tina for providing the photos. Tina is in the USA and I encourage readers to visit her blog at Travels and Trifles or her professional website. Please tell her I sent you and feel free to comment on her images here. Tina’s work is copyrighted by Tina R Schell Photography.

This post is also part of Ludwig’s Monday Window challenge and Jo’s Monday Walk.

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

As I walk, I look at the buildings. Regardless of the size and location, all have windows – those panes of glass providing light, views, and protection.

The windows are different sizes and orientations. The vast majority are rectangular but, the multi-sided and circular are few. However, all these windows trigger my thoughts on this day. Yes, windows – those mere openings in a wall covered by glass.

On this day, many clouds fill the sky while serving as a translucent window allowing light through while blocking what lies above. The occasional hole of blue serves as a reminder of other days while serving as a window into what lies beyond the clouds.

Even on cloudless days, the blue sky serves as a window shade to what lies beyond for night is what allows us to raise the shade to examine and dream about what lies far beyond.

My head turns away from the buildings toward the water. I spot the horizon – that line where the water meets the sky as I wonder what lies beyond that metaphoric window. I cannot imagine the thoughts of early explorers. Can you?

The water’s surface serves as a window into the beauty and history of what lies below. However, one seldom sees that aquatic underworld until passing through that window’s opening. Fortunately, photographers capture the scenes for others to see, enjoy, marvel, and wonder.

While we think of windows as a hole in the wall allowing light to pass, I think about another window – a surgical opening to provide a doctor the opportunity to examine and manipulate an inner world lacking windows.

I think of medical equipment as various scans and tests allowing medical professionals to peer through the opaque window of our skin and bones then into our interior world of normalcy and abnormality.

I think of microscopes allowing us to pass through a window into a world where our eyes cannot naturally go. I also think about telescopes taking us beyond our atmospheric window into a distant world that we try to imagine.

Our eyes give us a window into the world outside of us by providing an image that our brain transforms into a 3-D theater played in real-time complete with sound effects and smells.

I think of our eyes as windows into our personality, thoughts, and moods. For others, our eyes are windows for peering deep into the person’s soul. However, while a child’s eyes are open and honest, eyes are more difficult to read with age because one becomes more complex and complicated – just like life.

I think of other windows such as poems – a collection of the poet’s words causing us to reach deep into our soul for understanding the poet’s world – a world that the poet allows us to discover by looking through the window of their words.

I think of books as windows – both fiction and nonfiction for they expand our world by traveling through the window of knowledge and creativity with reflection, learning, and fantasy.

I think of learning as a process taking us through the window of our unknown world that works to close the window of ignorance while opening a seemingly infinite number of windows into a new world. But that also requires willingness and effort that some forego by choice.

I think of Windows operating many computers – plus the software windows containing electronic information on the screen or providing a workspace.

Our language adds another perspective about windows. We go window shopping, do window dressing, toss ideas out the window, and even tell someone that they are a better door than a window.

I think of windows as an interval of time – a span providing an opportunity – that golden hour – whether planned or by chance – that optimal moment for something to happen that could be personal or professional – a chance to grow, be enlightened, or a wonderful moment with a friend or loved one.

Windows are more than an opening in a structure with frames, sashes, panes, or rectangles treated with curtains, shades, blinds, drapes, or shutters. Windows – whether open or closed – real or a metaphor – windows are worth pondering.

Thinking about windows today has delivered a glimpse into the world of windows – but for some reason, I feel there is much more. However, it’s been a good day walking on the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

See what other bloggers have written about windows

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140 thoughts on “76 – Windows *”

  1. Hi Frank, thought provoking words as always and Tina’s photos are beautiful. We have a variety of windows in our home including a large stain glass octagonal (which my husband hand made with his mum doing the artwork) one and a round one. They add a different dimension which I guess is the case with all windows, whether windows to the soul or a window looking out into the world. Lovely poetic post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Miriam,
      Thank you for sharing the story of some of the windows in your home. I love the variety – and the fact that one window is a collaboration involving two family members. Wonderful! When someone refers to a walk as poetic, I’m humbled because writing poetry is difficult for me. Definite praise to Tina for her wonderful photos. Glad you enjoyed this collaboration.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Margaret,
      Thanks you. I’m consider myself to be very lucky for having a very giving and gifted set of photographers willing to share their work. Thanks for the suggestion about Ludwig’s. I discovered him a few days ago, so I moved this post up one day to participate. He even dropped by and commented here.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I never thought of poems as windows into the poet’s world before — what a perceptive idea, Frank! I enjoyed Tina’s collection of window photos. One of life’s simple pleasures, and so essential to mental health, is to spend time looking out of windows.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Barbara,
      Thank you for your kind words. One thing that I find common across all the walks is that the more I think about it, the more connections I make. It just happens – well, as long as I let the brain work its magic. Glad you enjoyed Tina’s beautiful images – and quite the variety!

      Liked by 1 person

          1. I think so Frank. I am the firsr Egyptian to comment here.
            The back ground of my page is a picture for nature, it is a farm in the front of my house.
            You could check my blog (Harvesting..,..) You would find pictures for nature here

            Like

  3. “…traveling through the window of knowledge and creativity with reflection, learning, and fantasy.” Wow! What a thought-provoking post. I do not think I will look at the world in exactly the same way. I will look for the windows that may not be obvious. Thank you Frank.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam,
      Thank you for your thoughtful comment. One thing that I’ve learned when writing a beach walk reflection … well … actually in the pre-write stage … thinking and converting thoughts into notes …. is that when one gives the mind a chance, it can (and generally will) take me beyond the obvious. Sure I encounter walls, but once things start to click, well …. that’s magical to me. I know you are a thinker, and would appreciate this thought. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderful, wonderful windows! As fascinating as doors. As a fantasy writer, I was naturally drawn to this: “I think of books as windows – both fiction and nonfiction for they expand our world by traveling through the window of knowledge and creativity with reflection, learning, and fantasy.” 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Loved your post Frank – not surprisingly you’ve taken us to places we’d never have thought of on our own! Appreciate your sharing your thoughts with my images – always wonderful to collaborate with you knowing your amazing ability to provide perspective on a subject. Well done as always my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tina,
      Thank you, Tina. Windows is an interesting word once one gets beyond the obvious. One of my goals at BWR is to stimulate thinking in others – and it seems this post accomplished that. However, your fabulous images are the topping! Thank you for your willingness to share and for interacting with the readers here.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What interesting photos, especially the wavy one (perhaps a bridge??). And Frank, I’ve got to hand it to you — you really give me pause to ponder. Who knew there were this many ways to think about windows?!?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Debbie and thanks for the comment re the windows. The wavy windows were a wall in a gloriously beautiful garden in China. There was so much to see and shoot I had a hard time knowing which way to turn at any given moment!

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Debbie,
      I’m glad you asked about abut the wavy image. I just looked again, and think it is a decorative wall. Then I noticed Tina answered in her reply, so I hope you saw it. Meanwhile, creative thinking is what I try to do with my thoughts … so I’m thinking having accomplished that with you in this walk. Thanks for the kind words.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Great post……I began noticing windows when I became interested in architecture – particularly in Europe. We went into every cathedral/church/house of worship we came across and it was not just the calm I sought, it was to see how the light played through the beautiful stained glass windows. Our world is full of various types of windows isn’t it and you, the artwork and beautiful music bring us the appreciation of all of the windows in our lives. Thank you for that – many of us have spent the last year looking OUT and looking forward to when we can look IN again.

    Pam

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Looking in versus looking out – what a perfect thought for this week’s post Pam! I have several images that showed light streaming through stained glass windows – also one of my favorite things – maybe next time 😊

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Pam,
      Thank so much for sharing a bit about your windows journey. Stained glass is precious … and the churches in Europe provide countless opportunities to explore lighting. Here are several places that caught my eye. I adored the stained glass is La Sagrada. Then again, the entire place captivated me. The cathedrals in Central Europe also fascinated me because their artists (in general) had a different style. I also adore the stained glass at my church here. Interesting how different it looks for the inside depending on the time of day. I love seeing it at night when a light is on inside the church. Meanwhile, your looking in versus looking out description is perfect for the past year! …. and no doubt applicable in other times as well. Thanks for sharing!!!!

      Like

    1. Margie,
      Tina is a fabulous photographer, so I’m thankful she is willing to share with us. I’m lucky to have skilled, thoughtful, and kind collaborators. I like to think, and once I get beyond the obvious, connections start to happen. On the other hand, it doesn’t happen all at once. Here’s a past walk I invite you to read …. actually the first one that introduces the blog. https://beachwalkreflections.wordpress.com/2020/10/20/1-introducing/ … thanks for the kind words!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Ludwig,
      Welcome first-time beach walker to my personal beach. Thanks for coming over, which makes me happy that I stopped by. This walk as “a breeze of fresh air – coming through a new window” makes me smile, but I’m also humbled by your high praise. Plus, you got to see how my collaborations work. Today was a busy day for me, thus I am behind here, but I want to come over to visit your participants. In what part of the world are you located?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi Frank! I do admire your collaboration. That is marvelous! I looked at your topics list – but found nothing there that could be illustrated with any of my photos. That is not a criticism of your topics, haha. Monday Window bloggers come from all over – Australis, the Far East, Europe, and from here in the Americas. I am at home in Georgia – Peachtree Corners – northeast of Atlanta. I could not quite figure out where your beach is located.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Hello Georgia. I’m actually in beachless Cincinnati, but when I’m at the beach, I do my snowbird thing in Orange Beach, Alabama. Thanks for the feedback. Thanks for looking at the Topics List, but too bad you didn’t see anything to match you to your photography. To toss out an idea, Time is a broad topic with many ways of going about it.

          Liked by 1 person

  8. Tina’s a marvelous photographer and these shots simply showcase that. I particularly enjoyed the last single image with all the broken windows and the last one on the bottom left with the art around it. Lots to think about here, Frank.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for that lovely compliment Janet. As you know, we photographers love broken, dilapidated things 😊, rather odd of us if you think about it! I too loved the window with the art – it was part of a wall that had more art from the same artist. Apparently he is well-known and very much admired in his own country.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much Monika, somehow Frank makes magic with those of us who collaborate with him. BTW I absolutely loved the image you use as your “about us” page and greatly admire the work you do.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I love your many and varied definitions of windows, Frank. Tina’s photos interspersed with your narrative are really lovely. I’m sitting here at home, looking out if my windows and watching the birds enjoying the seed in the feeder. I remember reading about the window tax which was imposed in the 1600’s, when people were taxed on the number of windows in their houses. This resulted in many windows being bricked up. It was only repealed almost 150 years later after people campaigned against it, saying it was a tax on health as one needs light and air to stay healthy. How mean can governments be? 😱

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Sylvia, glad you enjoyed Franks post and his as-always thoughtful approach to their use. Loved your comment about the window tax – had no idea and agree wholeheartedly about what a mean approach it was!

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Sylvia,
      Glad you enjoyed this wide look at windows and Tina’s wonderful images. Interesting story about windows determine the fax. I’ve got the feeling that is why (in some locations) houses were built sideways – that is, a side of the house facing the street. After all, it has fewer windows. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I’ll stick with architecture, Frank. Windows in that realm are more than complex enough to understand. You have a good handle on all the other windows. I love the pictures today.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I thought it was me that was out of sync, Frank, but I spotted your comment to Margaret about the timing of this post. Well done for capturing Tina to work with you. Our Lens Artists are busy ladies, and stun me with their work every week. 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jo,
      I can’t say enough about the Lens Artists sharing their beauty with me here. They are wonderful, so I am most appreciative! Sorry for the out-of-sync feeling I caused you. Dealing with that feeling isn’t any fun, so I’m prescribing the most effective antidote that is accepted worldwide – an extra piece of cake. Good luck! Keep me posted on your recovery. Your comment also gave me an idea – why not link to your last Monday walk? Bingo! After all, this is the first-ever Monday beach walk!

      Like

  12. I really enjoyed all your metaphorical musings on windows as well as Tina’s more literal images. We have lots of windows in our house with amazing views. It’s better to keep them clean, but quite a chore!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Eilene,
      Your thought about cleaning the windows made me laugh. On the other hand, although I’ve never been to your city, I’m imagining mountains in one direction and open plains in another. A natural paradox! 🙂 Nonetheless, glad you enjoyed the combination of words and photos that Tina and I put together here.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Frank, for some reason this quote came to my mind (from deep down from my childhood catechism no doubt!):
    “Throw open the windows of the Church and let the fresh air of the Spirit blow through.” Pope John XXII.
    The fact of fresh air at this time in history is even more alluring – we have but to ‘open our own windows’.
    Tina: your images are so unique…I’m especially drawn to your windows in the wall photo.
    Thank you both for the excellent collaboration!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Laura,
      The fact that this walk caused your mind to trigger two wonderful quotes makes me smile. After all, one of my goals is stimulating readers to think. Many thanks for sharing!!! Cheers to the joy that Tina’s images brought to you. She is a wonderful photographer and I’m thrilled that she shares them with me to share with readers.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. So glad you enjoyed the windows – I’m always on the lookout for interesting windows and doors as well. Either or both can make or break an architect’s efforts, don’t you think?!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks very much for the comment on the images Connie Elisabeth, I always enjoy collaborating with Frank as I know he’ll use my work to its best advantage 😊

      Like

  14. Nice reflections, Frank! You are a window. The reflections off your window, are what I see here today.
    Tina’s photos are fabulous. She sure photographed some amazing and interesting windows.

    This reflection reminded me of a joke from elementary school.
    “Why did little moron throw the butter out of the window? He/she wanted to see a butterfly.”

    Would a person living in a glass house be living in a window?
    I was dealing with taxes all day. I’m discombobulated. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh my Resa, so glad Frank and I managed to break you from the taxes! Appreciate your comments on the photos – I’m always on the lookout for those that are interesting and different.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Resa,
      I’m very thrilled that this post was able to not only take you away from dealing with taxes but also rekindle the tumblers in your mind to recall the butter-butterfly joke. Glad you enjoyed Tina’s excellent pictures, and thanks for the kind words. This might the first time I ever been referred to as a window (in a good way). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Oh my goodness, Frank, what a lovely musing about windows! I swear you will never run out of topics to share. You are a window into the human psyche. (And I would never have thought of medical professionals and machines as windows into the human body. Good one.) Hope all has been well with you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Kathy!
      The Queen of Lake Superior is back! That means spring is upon you up there, meaning you have thawed! 🙂 Thanks for the kind words. In my eyes, there is no limit on the topics. I periodically update the Topics Lists page – plus I keep another list (offline of possible ideas). Believe me, it is long. Thanks for the kind words and I’m glad I was able to expand your world of windows. All well with you?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ha ha, Frank! I am not sure I’ve thawed (although it’s been over 80 for a few days) but I suddenly and fiercely missed you guys and the blogging world and had to check in and see how you were all faring.

        Like

  16. I have only one thing to say. Wow.
    Actually, I have 2 things. Yesterday I had a lens replacement. The eye is still recovering, somewhat sore, and I’ve had to turn down the brightness setting on the laptop. The eyes are a window and sometimes life’s experiences a cast dulling film over them. It’s great to see again

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Beautiful photography! I enjoyed the photos very much. And clever to remind that microscopes and medical equipment also offer windows into the diagnostic world of medical investigation. I wouldn’t have automatically thought to include!

    Like

    1. Debra,
      Coming up with my thoughts isn’t always easy. However, what is consistent is that once my mind gets beyond the superficial, other ideas start to come forward. On the other hand, sometimes that takes a while. Tina provided wonderful images, so I happy you appreciate them.

      Like

  18. Hello Frank and Tina, first off I love the images, so sharp and vibrant but I have to say I really like the wavy bridge image. It reminded me of a “wavy house” I saw when I visited Sopot in Gdansk, Poland – the building is called Krzywy Domek (strangely I visited Poland in 1996 and I saw a “Crooked House” but Krzywy Domek is listed as being built in 2004! So I’m not 100% certain it’s the same building).
    And to Frank, not only do telescopes open windows to the many galaxies and star systems out there but they give us a glimpse of our pasts as the lights we see in our skies began their journeys many hundreds, thousands even millions of years ago and are only just reaching us now! So telescopes could be viewed as Time Travel Windows.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tyeth,
      Thanks for checking out one of the other walks. Tina is a wonderful photographer and I enjoy collaborating with with. On behalf of her, thanks for your appreciation. Love your extra info about telescopes. It’s so good, I wish I would have came up with that thought. 🙂 …. Love the info about the wavy house in Poland.

      Liked by 1 person

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