81 – Passageways *

Special thanks to Fraggle for providing the photos. Fraggle is in the UK and I encourage readers to visit her photography blog Fraggle: Rocking a camera across the universe. Please tell her I sent you and feel free to comment on her images here. All images are copyrighted by Fraggle and Fragglerocking Photo Blog.

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like to walk on the beach. It is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

I’m looking at the water that seems endless. I know what I see is only a tiny fraction of this water because I only see the surface – and to think all this water, including the water below, is only a drop of the world’s water. But this water can lead anyone to many places.

Today I’m thinking about passageways – something that one passes through on the way to somewhere or someplace. Passageways are an access – a corridor, alley, tunnel, street, or path – a breezeway, archway, entrance, gate, door, aisle, catwalk, or hallway – a ticket, key, or passport.

A passageway is an invitation – a way to make sense of where we are and the opportunities that lie ahead. Well, as long as one has an open mind. I see the whack line left by the most recent high tide serving as a path guiding my way – a gateway to keep walking. Yes – an invitation.

Sometimes we identify passageways by an arch with a buttress, arches over doors, old city gates built in medieval times, but still present in Europe. Arches that span, vault, support, and even decorate passageways old and new. We associate arches with gateways, buildings, architecture, national parks, landmarks, St. Louis, and McDonald’s.

Windows are a passageway of gaining a perspective – but only if we see them leading to something better or at least an explanation.

Corridors are more than a narrow hallway because they also have to do with shipping lanes, flight paths, and tracts of land – yet all of these are passageways.

I like cruising for a vacation. Passengers start by following the passageways through the port terminal and up the gangplank onto the ship. The ship’s passageways are from large doors to grand staircases to the narrow corridors of the cabin area.

While our senses are a passageway into the world around us, eyes are also the passageway to the person’s soul – so look. But through the ages of time, the eyes also are the passageways to the depth of poetry and proses. Hearing is the passageway way to music and lyrics. Our senses and mind also use the arts such as writing, painting, sculpting, theater, and more as passageways to a fuller life.

Every personal encounter with someone new involves the passageway of possibility – mentor, friend, confidant, lover, or just a positive person who lifts us – but will we face them with an open mind? Could it be the love at first sight that opens the passageway to the heart? Could it lead to a professional opportunity?

Creativity and innovation must pass through the passageway of risk where one may encounter the door of fear – but how we face risk and fear will be part of our fate with the challenge.

Ellis Island in New York City was the passageway to a new world for immigrants during the great migration – a passageway my paternal grandparents stepped through. However, I know this scene occurred for many across the world as they entered a new land.

I firmly believe the more one knows, the more they realize how little they know because there is so much to learn. Perhaps as I look across the water, this is a sea of knowledge serving as a passageway to knowledge. There is so much water – so much to learn – as well as with more depth than we realize.

Mathematics is the passageway to a greater understanding through a language that is much more than equations and calculations. Science offers one passageway of knowing and understanding the natural world. But science does not corner the truth about everything because other disciplines such as ethics, history, philosophy, psychology, theology, and other social sciences can enhance a perspective.

While learning is the passageway to knowledgeable adventures, life experiences are the passageway to wisdom, humility, pain, joy, and empathy for others.

Looking around as I stand, I notice the passageways: the water surface, the horizon, a hole in the clouds, balconies and doors on buildings, constructed walkways, gates, shells, and more. All passageways that my brain linked together into a common theme – a theme worthy of my thoughts as I walk. After all, I like walking on the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.


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112 thoughts on “81 – Passageways *”

  1. While there are so many types of passageways my mind immediately took me back to Venice where there are endless passageways to explore. Narrow and wide alike but the narrow always drew me in as 9 times out of 10 there was a treasure to find at the end – a small shop, an artisan or musician….. Passageways take us to MORE. I like Arthur Ashe’s quote, “I keep sailing on in the middle passage. I’m sailing into the wind and the dark but I’m doing my best to keep my boat steady and my sails full.” The middle passage is I think where most of us want to be but we can’t help but take the beckoning passage to life’s surprises along the way. Great post Frank as always.

    Pam

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam,
      I can’t believe I didn’t mention Venice because it is a great example of passageways. When we stopped in Venice via cruise ship, I asked a teen passenger what she thought – and she had a great description. (I paraphrase) Venice is like a Christmas gift you are excited to open but don’t know what is inside. That’s what going down an alley and turning the corner is like. …. That’s perfect! Otherwise, thanks for the wonderful Arthur Ashe quote and got you enjoyed this post.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful paths you’ve taken us to, spiritually and with Fraggle’s photos.
    It’s true what you say about learning, as Socrates put it “The more I learn the less I realize I know”, so we keep walking the path of knowledge. Brilliant post, my friend.
    Yamas!

    Like

    1. Marina,
      Thanks for the Socrates version of my thoughts about knowledge. He said it well. Hmmmm …. I think I have a “learning/knowledge” walk that I need to move up. “_ Meanwhile, I’m happy that you enjoy this stroll with my words and Fraggle’s outstanding photos. Yamas!

      Like

  3. Hard to resist heading into a passageway, not knowing what is in there, or even if there is a way out at the end of it. Something a lot like marriage, in my experience. 🙂
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Ah, Ellis Island. My paternal grandparents came through that passageway, too. It was amazing visiting it and contemplating what made them decide to come and what the experience must have been like. All our passages through the corridors of life change us and others in so many ways…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Barbara,
      It’s scary to think about all the corridors of life. Simply, so many. Thanks for sharing about your grandparents going through Ellis Island. I haven’t visited it yet, but want and need to! There’s a great video about Ellis Island that I love. I almost used it in this post, but I save it on a walk about heritage. Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on your beach walk. A passageway is a great pondering point.
    Both my maternal and paternal grandparents came through Ellis Island. I can only imagine what they must have felt.

    Loved Fraggle’s photos, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mae,
      Welcome first-time commenter to by friendly beach. Glad you enjoyed my mental wandering around passageways that accompany Fraggle’s wonderful images. I try to have a consistent message of positive tone that stimulates thinking … so I hope I did that for you. Cheers to your grandparents coming through Ellis Island. Fasicinating … and thanks for sharing. I see you are in Central Pennsylvania. (Home for me in Cincinnati). How did you find out about this place?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi, Frank. Thanks for the warm welcome. I hopped over from Fraggle’s reblog. Loved your reflections and wonderfully soothing and thought inspiring everything was. My second home was east coast beaches, so I appreciate those wandering walks 😉

        Like

        1. Thanks for letting me know that you came from Fraggle’s. Off the top of my head, this is the third or fourth collaboration we’ve done … heck, maybe fifth … and we will have another one in the next two weeks. (Hands) I consider myself lucky to have her and other wonderful photographers willing to share! Feel free to look around. After all, there are 80 other beach walks. The * are the collaborations. Several walk are based on comments by readers, which I find interesting. See Beaches v1 and v2 for examples.

          Liked by 1 person

    1. Kim,
      Thanks for the kind words and glad you enjoyed the my collaboration with Fraggle. Yes, her photos are wonderful. To be honest, the b&W photo captured my attention, but because I knew where it was, I considered not using it …. but the visual attraction of it as a passageway drew me in. Walking those grounds is chilling. If I could require one place for everyone in the world to visit, it may be there.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I love the concept of passageways literal and figurative. You write about so many of these important passageways of life: windows, doors, knowledge, spiritual, artistic. Without passageways, we would be stagnant beings. THANK you for including my story on “The Passageway.” I’m honored. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Like Pam, I love the concept of passageways–and the word, as well.
    Fraggle’s photos are stunning. The last is also my favorite. The one of Auschwitz is chilling–I don’t want to think of that passageway.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Merril,
      Oh yes – the word {passageways} is a big one and I only scratch the surface. Yet, not all are positive. I struggled with using the Auschwitz photo, but I knew it was an aspect that helps make the point – yet more horrifying than I can imagine. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Following that idea you presented, the more you know . . the more you know you don’t know, yanno? And isn’t that the great thing about learning though? The adventure of it all. Like . . walking down a mysterious passageway.

    These captures are fantastic, btw.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. “While learning is the passageway to knowledgeable adventures, life experiences are the passageway to wisdom, humility, pain, joy, and empathy for others.”
    Bottom line: everything is interconnected…life, learning, truth, science, pathways, doorways, etc are not a series of “either/ors” forever clan in stone…but more often turn up as ‘in addition tos’.
    Passageways entice the curious and encourage even the most timid to venture forth!
    As always your posts serve as passageways to creative thinking and pondering.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Frank,
    First off, Fraggle’s photos are outstanding! Makes me want to go back to Italy yesterday.
    Passageways are always inviting – I can very rarely resist – which explains just how I got soooo lost in Siena! And now I see why you thought my WW photo goes well with this post! Lovely all ’round.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      Thank you … and glad you enjoyed Fraggle’s wonderful photos. Your WW pic was perfect timing with this post – gotta love serendipitous blog moments. To me, the old cities in Europe have passageways that speak to me and they draw me in like a magnet. Also, I’ve been thinking about how power of images as passageways – oh what a powerful visual metaphor!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Very much so. And yes, it did look like a sort of passageway. Serendipity! I’ve only really had a chance to see so little of European cities but I have to agree. I cannot wait to go exploring again.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Fraggle’s last photo is indeed beautiful. I want to be there right now! Yours is a wonderful contemplation of passages, the risk and fear, and the wide ocean of possibilities contained in passing through unknown ‘places.’ How we need to be brave enough to go through more than one on the same journey of discovery. Two others come to mind…birth and death and the tunnel of light.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Mary Jo,
      I not only greatly appreciate your praise, I’m also humbled. Thank you. Passageways are many in life, so I’ve only scratched the surface. However, cheers to your addition of birth, death, and the tunnel of light as passagways. Perfect additions to this walk. Thank you!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Fraggle takes fabulous photos!
    I like this post a lot Frank. Passageways is not an obvious theme for reflections, but neither was Candles.
    However, they both have a lot of merit, and food for thought!
    I enjoyed this morning walk, at 3:00 in the afternoon.
    Thank you to you & Fraggle!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Resa,
      I appreciate your kind thoughts about this collaboration – especially Fraggle’s photos. I know you have looked at the Topic List, I’m sure there are other topics that served served as head scratchers. On the other hand, so many topics are worth the thought if one takes the time to think about it. After all, as a creative person, I know you know that – and that your can’t limit yourself when you are designing. 🙂 Thank you, Resa!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. The passage of time is the gateway to wisdom…

    It seems to me that there are far more architectural passageways in Europe than here in America.
    And there is the Northwest passage, through the arctic region of Canada, and others along both the east and west coast of North America, and likely many other continents.

    How about the passage that Jesus mentioned in his talk to the people around him….the so called Eye of the Needle. I do think that is more about life than a real thing, though there is much talk about camel hair ropes, needles and narrow short gates…

    I am right now on my own journey, a passageway from toxicity and inflammation to detox and healing. (Of my joints, some of which are very sore, hot and swollen.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ingrid,
      You have just expanded the thoughts of passageway by many fold. Spiritual text are filled with many passageways. After all, passagway is a powerful metaphor. Your personal journey to improve your condition is an practical passageway – and I wish you the best in that journey. Thank you for sharing and for your support here.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Jennie,
      Welcome first-time commenter to my friendly beach where I welcome all. My aims here are to be positive, calm, and thought-provoking. Fortunately, I got the idea to collaborate with photographers to help me deliver a message. I thrilled that you enjoyed this. How did you discover me?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I really did. A fellow blogger, Fragglerock, posted your beautiful photos. Did you used to be a high school teacher? I gather that from your comments. Will follow you, Frank. Thank you, and all the best.

        Liked by 1 person

          1. You’re welcome, Frank. Glad to know you were a high school teacher. Honestly, most of the teaching blogs I come across are terrible. They’re all about curriculum and lessons, not about the children. I write about what happens in my classroom, ‘moments’ that matter with children. I recommend Pete Springer’s blog. He’s a retired teacher and often writes about his teaching. If you look him up, tell him Jennie said Hi. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            1. So much of today’s curriculum is locked in. Sure, there can be creative approaches to the topic, but the mandate still controls the way. Therefore, the focus favors covering a topic instead of learning and applying the topic. I doubt if I would handle that well.

              Liked by 1 person

  14. I loved the video! I believe they are at the very parks I just visited, but it didn’t say where the videos were taken. And I thought photo number 3 was my favorite, until I saw the last photo! Well done Fragile❣❣ Frank, what came to mind as I read through your posts was the passageways hidden deep below the ocean surface. What passageways do the sea creatures venture through from day to day as they travel the ocean deep, search for their food, or migrate from season to season… deep thoughts 😊 If I were younger I would love to experience scuba diving. But I do snorkel anytime I get the chance.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Lisa,
      I’m thrilled that you watched and enjoyed the video. I search and take my time selecting videos that I think are appropriate for each walk, so I’m thrilled at your positive feedback. I never my thoughts took passageways to another level. Meanwhile, the comments by readers have taken my thoughts even deeper. Thank you! Cheers to your level for the deep sea for for going through the surface’s passageway.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Fascinating thoughts about passageways today, Frank. I’d never before considered just how many passageways there might be. So many openings to so many interesting places!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Debbie,
      If this post got you thinking and expanding your view, I take that as high praise. Many thanks to you! Whereas this post opened the viewpoint of passageways for many, numerous comments by readers broadened & deepened my view – so thanks for being part of that for me.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. What beautiful photos you lined up, Frank. We are about to pass on to the next season. Even in the far north the photos I’ve been seeing show beautiful clear lakes, and people enjoying gardens and outdoor sports. In the southern hemisphere, residents are about to take a passageway into winter. Time is one long passageway from season to season, and each bend in the passageway is enjoyable. Thanks for exploring this topic, Frank. We have a long journey ahead of us. I found you a great passageway quote, Frank. “I have come to believe that there are infinite passageways out of the shadows, infinite vehicles to transport us into the light.” — Martha Beck

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marsha,
      So glad you enjoyed this walk. Life is full of passageways. Many commented about me broadening their view of passageways. However, so many comments expanded my view – including your additions about the seasons. Thank you for the addition and for the wonderful quote.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Reading your post I realized that I have always found passageways interesting. I can think of a few that I encountered in the city of San Francisco and never forgot their unique and inviting character. Also some of your thoughts on passageways made me think of Paulo Coelho – he has some great metaphors for windows and eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. another beautiful beach walk Frank exploring the passages of time and life. And pics and music spectacular as well

    Loved this:

    “Every personal encounter with someone new involves the passageway of possibility – mentor, friend, confidant, lover, or just a positive person who lifts us – but will we face them with an open mind? “💖❤️

    Like

  19. Such interesting photos. It would appear that Fraggle has traveled to some interesting places. I really liked your reference to Ellis Island as a passageway. That was a clever utilization of the concept and so true!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cheryl,
      Fraggle captured a variety of passageways, so I’m happy they captured your attention … and their link and application to life are quite profound. … and the passageways in Bologna are wonderful. From the narrow passageways in the Old City to the porticoes of main city – wow – so beautiful and wonderful. And to think I don’t think I preferred to them in this walk. Shame on me!

      Liked by 1 person

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