82 – Nature *

Special thanks to Jane (Jane Lurie Photography) for providing the photographs. I encourage readers to visit her at Jane Lurie Photography: Jane’s Lens. All photos are copyrighted by Jane Lurie Photography.

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

When I think of nature, a variety of terms come to mind: surroundings, landscapes, the natural world, creation, Mother Nature, planet Earth, environment, flora, fauna, the living world, and scenery – let alone places such as beaches, forests, meadows, mountain tops, nature preserves, parks, and more.

Nature is the place where the living world and the nonliving physical world interact in a meaningful relationship. Here at the beach, that includes the air, water, light, sand, and rocks meeting the life of the sea and shore – the varieties of fish, crabs, clams, worms, and more – let alone the land bird feasting on the sea – and people, too.

Nature is where living things compete against each other for food, space, shelter, water, and even mates. As many will scowl at the thought of a wolf killing a rabbit, we tend to forget about the wolf needing to care for itself and its offspring.

Nature has a hierarchy. Not in terms of importance – but one of the relationships – a complex order that is subject to changes within nature’s laws governing that order. The hierarchical food chain is in the sand – both at and away from the waterline – plus in the water of the sea and the intercoastal water across the street – as well as in the ponds, lakes, streams, and the river of home in Ohio.

Nature is both the setting and boundaries of science – our delivery system for explaining our surroundings and natural occurrences. Marine biologists and oceanographers have studied these waters for years – and they also do so today and will tomorrow.

Nature – governed by its laws – the way nature works through forces, processes, and interactions. Humans use science to discover that nature is more beautiful than what we see – but science is not going to explore anything beyond the natural world.

The pleasures of nature are for everyone and anyone willing to place themselves in a position of awe and wonder. Nature is a place to ask questions and think about leaves and seeds, sand and rocks, ground and soil, flora and fauna, water and air, countless facets of humanity, and more.

Nature is the setting for human interaction with one another. Our natural surrounding is the setting for the dramatic performances of human history and the common events of each day – including the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Nature has influenced human cultures throughout history. We’ve seen nature as a source of the power of our deities. Through the gods of the sun, moon, and seas, we have placed spiritual significance on eclipses, moon phases, water, and general awe of the heavens through nature. With nature providing a sense of life, purification, and creation, humanity has a history of looking to nature as a creative source to quench other daily needs. Yes, humanity has a long history of valuing nature.

Nature is our surroundings – a place for personal reflections at any given moment. Nature is the surroundings allowing us to temporarily remove ourselves from the trials and tribulations of our everyday world. My time away from home as a snowbird on the beach is more than being in warmer weather for winter – it also is a getaway from the routine of my normal world – which is my life as an alter ego.

Nature is a place we can get lost in its awe. Nature is a place with feathered symphonies, singing insects, moving water, many scents, a spectrum of colors, varying shapes, countless participants, serene views, and so much more. Nature can heighten one’s awareness of just about anything.

This beach is a place where people – including me – value contact with the natural world. This beach is a system of objects and entities with direct and indirect links to all its parts. This beach is a component of nature’s strong, intricate system of parts and processes. Yet, a wonderful place to relax.

Nature is more than something to think about – but thinking about it is good. Meanwhile, I like walking the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

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157 thoughts on “82 – Nature *”

  1. What a great post my friend and great shots by Jane.
    Nature is also ferocious and can by no means be ‘tamed’, something we tend to forget. We should remember that we are just a part of it and respect it or her (Nature in greek is female).
    Happy weekend, my friend.
    Yamas!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Marina,
      Ferocious and untamable are interesting thoughts about nature. I agree – but with different terminology. I shake my head when I hear that Mother Nature being weak … oh no … I see her as strong. Cheers to Jane’s wonderful images. Yamas!

      Like

  2. Yes, nature is all those things, Frank, and things we don’t understand, as well. At our family Zoom last night, we were trying to imagine if the world’s ecosystem would crash if we could get ride of certain things like bed bugs, ticks, and mosquitos. 😀 Lovely photos by Jane.
    And my Nature Waltz poem about bees.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Merril,
      All living things play a role within nature – a niche – even the things that we don’t enjoy. So what did the family decided about the world without bedbugs, ticks, and mosquitoes? Thank you for your Nature Waltz poem, which to me, fits will with this post. Glad you enjoyed Jane’s wonderful images.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We didn’t come to any firm conclusion–though of course we all understand the role of even things we do not enjoy. Older child and their wife were about to go on a bat walk–perhaps they have more insights. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Fraggle,
      Thank you for the kind words for my writing and Jane’s photos. Nature is unquestionably complex. I see you point of nature being both kind and cruel – but I propose a twist because whether kind or cruel is a matter of perspective. Just something to ponder. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. We are all a part of nature whether we want to admit it or not. We may live in concrete jungles but we bring nature into our homes and nurture them. We have an inherent need to be surrounded by it, even when we are not.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ashish,
      Welcome first-time commenter to my sandy beach. Not only thanks for sharing your thoughts. Nature is indeed the stage where all life interaction occurs. I also appreciate you writing your past post. If you didn’t write it, I would not have been able to include it here. 🙂 Thank you also for the kind words, especially about the structure. No matter the topic, I try to be very deliberate with each walk; plus, I try to have consistency from walk-to-walk (no matter the topic). My apologies for the delayed response, but I hope you return.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you Frank for the kind welcoming words. If that is the case, we both will have to thank Soni who organised a writing contest on Nature for which i wrote that post 🙂😊. We all are part of the same ecosystem. Yours is a very unique blog name and so is the concept. Really appreciate it. It’s okay, thanks for your response here. Stay connected 🙂😊

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Cheers to Soni for accidently bringing us together. I’ve had a Soni here before. Each of my walks feature a different topic. The first 25 or so were about beach-related things – sand, waves, sun, wind, sky, clouds, etc …. Now the topics are wide-ranging … My first walk helps explain. https://beachwalkreflections.wordpress.com/2020/10/20/1-introducing/ ….. You can also see most of the past walks by clicking the 3 dots in the upper right corner, then Posts.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. To think, we’re included in this engine of nature and yet there are times when it feels as if we’re the party crashers. But of course that’s because the people whose research makes nature all the more accessible to us usually work in the quiet. They’re not loud and boisterous, and they’re not looking to further a brand. They’re just doing the great good work on the countless miracles of this world we call home.

    Love the nature walk, Frank. AND the captures . . once again a home run.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Marc,
      You provided two points that stick out to me: the concepts of party crashers and those working in quiet. The party-crasher idea is the most intriguing because the party wasn’t for them, yet once they arrive, they take the party over as if it was their party. Of course, once they leave, the mess remains for the host. Does this fit?

      PS: The Reds first 4-game sweep of the Cards in St.L since 1990!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes that’s it. And we experienced just such a thing with He who must not be named . . . the certain someone who is still attempting to drag the republic down to his level.

        PS- Good for you guys. The Barry Larkin-led Reds of 1990? Wow.

        PS2- “Attention Aaron Boone, please go to the nearest white courtesy phone” . . .

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Dan,
      So glad you appreciate Jane’s pictures. I consider myself lucky that she is willing to share with me here – not only this time, but also in the past. Hopefully, the future will provide a third time. Glad you also enjoyed my words – and if this got you thinking, you know I’m happy!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. A beautiful meditation on nature, Frank. These words coincidentally relate to my recent poem: “Nature is both the setting and boundaries of science…and…Nature is the surroundings allowing us to temporarily remove ourselves from the trials and tribulations of our everyday world.” Thank you again for introducing me to another great photography blog to follow!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Mary Jo,
      I smile at your continual appreciation of the collaborators who share their photos here. I love the fact that you visit, follow, and visit them. Each are wonderful and have their own personal style. Plus, thanks for sharing two of your favorite thoughts of mine. To me, those two thoughts capture the vastness of nature.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Love the photos and the thoughts on something we must learn to value more than we do right now – nature and its endless and amazing gifts. Do we have to wait until it’s a problem in order to notice it? We hear about plants and animals becoming extinct – I worry about that. Nature has given and given and we have taken freely…..but its’ patience with us is NOT endless. Great post and so very much to think about!

    Pam

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Pam,
      Excellent thoughts about nature. Love your thoughts about nature giving and we taking. Minutes ago I saw a drought map comparing last year and this year. Amazing. Although someone has to notice to be able to create the graphic, but does humanity notice? Better yet, does humanity really care? On the other hand, let us not forget that many extinctions occurred long before human existence … then again, that’s not the same as has human-caused extinctions. Thanks for sharing & glad you enjoyed Jane’s outstanding images.

      Like

    1. Lisa,
      Glad you saw this post and thanks for the kind words. To me, nature is more than just the outside or a place like a woods, a mountain top, or a beach. It’s actually quite complex. To me, Jane’s photos fit that thought. Meanwhile, I invite you to join me for a collaboration. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Living as I do in the mountains, I am surrounded by nature that is constantly changing and warping into new pockets of tranquility. Love your thoughts on the importance of the outdoors and how it helps us focus and refine as well as wander in our thoughts. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Jane,
      Thank you for the kind words and for your willingness to share your work with me and my readers. Using collaborators is extra work for me, but to me, it’s been very rewarding. … now if I can get more collaborators. Meanwhile, hopefully we can share again in a few months.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Nature is certainly my favorite place, Frank, and although I’ve already mentioned it to her before, Jane’s photos are just outstanding. She’s one of my inspirations.

    janet

    P.S. Now that I’m back home, give me a few days and I’ll work on my promised photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Donna,
      I know you love being outdoors, so I’m glad you saw this walk. Nature unquestionably wears many hats, yet, nature is strong, and will crush whatever necessary in order to maintain a balance. However, that adjustment will have an effect on others. Thanks for sharing some of your thoughts.

      Like

    1. Debbie,
      Nature as a place to heal and think are great thoughts … and I can attest to the power of the beach being my place for thinking. However, there are days when the brain is too busy zooming around, therefore preventing deep thinking … but when all is in sync, thoughts magically appear.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Unfortunately, we seem to be destroying the natural world at an exponential rate. I only hope that governments and industries can start to see that our very existence and our economies depend on the natural world and then learn to respect it, protect it and work in harmony with it.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Nature is a natural for this blog.
    Jane’s pics are wonderful. She has a unique eye. She’s a natural.
    You know that the food chain freaks me out. Still, I get it. It’s nature.
    Frank, it’s always lovely to stroll the beach with you, and reflect! Thank you!
    Wonderful video!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Resa,
      Although thoughts of food chains give you the willies. I’ glad you enjoyed this stroll and Jane’s outstanding images. Nature is a natural topic for this blog – so it took my 82 posts to include it. 😉 Happy to know you enjoyed the video. I appreciated its many views of nature – and I would think Enya is the most featured artists here

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Laurie,
      Thank you for appreciating Jane’s outstanding photographs. With each of the photographers I work with, I’ve learned that each has their own style & perspective. For what I tried to say about nature, Jane’s photos were wonderful companions. Cheers to the many lessons nature provides us – so let us hope we learn.

      Like

  11. Beautifully said, Frank. And, gorgeous photos. I feel the same way about nature, and a walk on the beach seems to bring in more of nature than a hike in the woods. Perhaps it’s the continuous sound of waves and the constant wind. Perhaps it is the experience of being barefoot in the sand. Every sense is on high alert at the beach. That opens the doors.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jennie,
      Happy to know that you enjoyed this. For me, obviously it’s the beach. To go along with your thoughts, it’s the combination of the things you mentioned and others. But the woods or mountain tops may give others the same feeling. Glad you enjoyed Jane’s wonderful photos. I am honored that she is willing to share with those like you,

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, there are many other elements that make the beach nearly perfect. I love how wrote about it. The mountains may do the same thing for others, but it’s the beach for me, too. Jane’s photos are beautiful, and perfect for your post. She was gracious to share them. Best to you, Frank.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. “This beach is a component of nature’s strong, intricate system of parts and processes.” So true… I’ve been reading “The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World” by Andrea Wulf. Fascinating how this polymath, explorer and naturalist changed humanity’s thinking about nature as something to be dominated and subdued to nature as one interconnected system. He lived from 1769 to 1859. Jane’s pictures are stunning! Beautiful post, Frank!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I agree with you, Barbara, “The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World” is by Andrea Wulf is a great read. It was my favourite read of the year two years ago.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Barbara,
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts and your appreciation of the book – and to think that book written so long ago would still be so applicable. Especially since they comparably knew so little about nature at that time. Glad you also enjoyed Jane’s stunning photos. I feel honored to share them here.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Actually, the book about Humboldt was written in 2016, but Humboldt was born in 1769. What a life he led. To think I had never heard of this amazing man before the title of this book got my attention! But now I know where Humboldt penguins got their name. 🙂

        Like

  13. This is such a wonderful combination of Jane’s superb images and your diverse approach to Nature, Frank. Kudos to you both!
    A walk on the beach is refreshing in every sense, a most uplifting experience for which I’m forever grateful.
    On another note;
    Nature only is.
    Nature is nature, neither cruel nor kind. I too enjoyed reading “The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World” by Andrea Wulf.
    A lovely post!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Dina,
      Thank you for the very kind words about my words and Jane’s outstanding images. I like “Nature is nature … and then thinking from there into its meaning. That can be a deep thought. Interesting how nature as cruel, kind, neither, or both is a matter of perspective. Great thoughts. 🙂 Thanks for the book endorsement!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha,
      Good questions. I would say two things about nature in urban settings. Regarding the typical view of nature, urban settings offer a many places that are not the concrete jungle. The only people who miss it are those who choose to ignore it. Then again, because nature is our surroundings, city center is very much part of nature. Meanwhile, the beach is typically not part of my summer experience.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Some fabulous shots to support your thoughts. Yes, Nature is something we’ve nearly all become aware of and grateful for these last months. Let’s hope it drives us to positive action too!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Margaret,
      Glad you enjoyed the tandem of my words and Jane’s photos. One of the positives of the pandemic is that many people have reconnected with the outdoors … and from what I can tell, it seems the natural world has appreciated our adjustment. I agree – let’s us hope that change drives positive action. Well stated.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Thank you for this walk again, Frank – Nature is everything to me – from grand to tiny…and Jane’s illustrating this in her own spectacular way – she is my role model.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Jane’s photography is very special. I particularly love the view looking up into the trees! The gifts of nature and my love of the natural world are at times what sustain me. Lovely post, Frank.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debra,
      Happy to know you enjoyed Jane’s photos …. especially because she’s somewhere in your area. The view of the trees is a good one, plus I thought it was an excellent opener. Meanwhile, knowing how much you enjoy the natural world, I knew you would enjoy this walk. 🙂

      Like

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