115 – Language v2

My thoughts about language filled me so much, I split those thoughts into two walks. Click here for the original. Also, thanks for the birthday greetings on the previous walk, and for sharing a bit of your personal heritage.

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

There are many aspects of human language – so many that I think the complexity of our language is one of the reasons humans differ from other organisms on our planet.

We use language to describe our reality – sometimes simply – other times as abstract or through imagination. Our language is a complex tool beyond the mere use of communication – but a sophisticated tool for solving problems, inspiring others, sharing memories, expressing emotions, thoughts, reflections, and more. 

Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

Our language is the words that create imagery – that mental picture that one can see or even feel without being there. Some of us have the gift of writing words that create images in others. 

Eyes seem to have their language. Some people focus on the eyes of the speaker or listener for a message because the eyes are the windows into a person’s thoughts. The eyes have a universal language with many interpreters. 

Language can be a whistle, bells, symbols, icons, signs, emojis, and more – all designed for communicating – all delivering a message.

Other senses are involved with language. Braille communicates words through touch. Morse code through hearing. Signing through sight. 

Photo by Eren Li on Pexels.com

Computing and IT use specialized languages involving symbols, rules, and equations as code – let alone the binary language composed only of zeros and ones.

Mathematics is a language expressing and explaining through numbers and units. Then one can transform the numbers into graphics for a visual expression – possibly noting trends. Mathematics and programming team together into the world of algorithms. The language of mathematics is demonstrating its power in today’s data-driven world. 

Music may be the greatest language in the world. Even if one does not understand the singer’s words, music moves the listener because they know good music when they hear it. After all, the language of musical lyrics carries messages that poetically touch souls. Through the language of music, a composer tells a story without words through instrumentals, overtures, concertos, and symphonies. 

The language of visual arts communicates stories and events. Sculptures, paintings, architecture, performance dance, and more communicate thoughts from the artist, but the viewer determines what the artist is saying. Maybe the viewer is the listener; but will they hear what the artist is saying? Will they see the artist’s intention? Will they interpret the same or something different?  

Photo by Magda Ehlers on Pexels.com

DNA is the language of molecular genetics – a language that also defines us through a story of heredity and evolution with only four letters. Plus, its application continues to grow. Let us not forget that DNA is the language of all living things on Earth.

Let us not forget that language is a way animals communicate with others through unique sounds for danger, mating, identification, and simply hey. Others signal you better think twice about coming closer. Yes, that is in their DNA and learned.

Language is more than a tool. Language displays what it means to be human along with the depth of the human spirit. Could Language be one of humanity’s greatest achievements? Maybe the greatest?

The layers of rocks tell the story of our geologic past through its language. Structure and ecological relationships among living things also tell a powerful story. Who would have thought that so many languages surround us?    

Photo by Sebastian Voortman on Pexels.com

Through its actions on the surface and the way it washes ashore, many who enjoy the beach say that the sea tells stories, conveys messages, and expresses emotions. We stand on the shore looking out to sea trying to decipher the language of the sea – and wondering about its stories – especially the ones taking place below the surface that is one way – but not the only way. 

The language of the sea – the language of the wind – the many languages of nature – the different languages of humanity – we have much to interpret.  These are good thoughts to ponder as I walk on the beach. After all, I like walking on the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

See what other bloggers have posted about Language

Next Post: Culture – Tuesday 23rd February @ 1 AM (Eastern US)

100 thoughts on “115 – Language v2”

    1. Jo,
      When I was at drafting a walk about language many moons ago, I realized the walk was way too long because there was so much to say. The spoken word isn’t the only and language is not solely human. In retrospect, I should have had the two walks much closer together. In terms of the cellist – great question – I’ve got the feeling that the language of music takes him to a special place. Thanks for walking along – and take care so you can get back to your hikes.

      Like

  1. Language and communication in all shapes and forms is almost a bottomless pit of a subject as it encompasses so much. Getting a point across or expressing something can happen in so many ways. There is language all around us….we just have to listen and not just with our ears but with our hearts.

    Pam

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam,
      Yes – language and communication is a bottomless pit. An excellent description … and the listeners are the ones who realize this. Simply so much to say. Hmmmm … volume 3? Well … it’s not even in note form yet, but who knows what the future holds. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. Language certainly is complex, Frank. For example, saying one thing and meaning another; or reading between the lines… knowing the correct meaning of a word which reads the same yet sounds different, for example ‘flower’… and knowing the difference between soft gentle music that convey different emotions.
    Indeed, a lot to think about.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. You bring us your thoughts in the language we read on this blog, that we can instantly translate – sorta – and you augment with photos and music, if we care to click. With the elements of language, we expand our world of understanding. Great thoughts, Frank/

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Music is the most wonderful language, to me, because it’s a language to which most people can agree on. They might not be able to agree on anything else, but music is the one thing they find agreement in.

    As for the unspoken languages of the earth and sky and star and ocean and weather. . that there is the most fascinating of all.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Scnorgel fliffit burripid norque.
    Obvi I am making an attempt to:
    A – Invent a new language
    B – Be funny
    C – Prove I am incoherent
    D – Thank you for this thoughtful Beach Walk.

    Here’s a language most of us understand.
    🍷 Clink 🍷

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Wonderful post again, Frank. Yes, I do believe that language is one of the greatest achievements of humankind, although we mustn’t forget that all living creatures have their own special snd sometimes mysterious ways of communicating with one another. I love the language of music especially. It can truly transport a person above the cares and sometimes even the woes of life. Just as an aside, the language I most enjoy hearing spoken is French, even though I can speak very little of it myself. Have a great weekend. 🤗

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sylvia,
      Thanks for the kind words. Now, why am I not surprised that you love the language of music? 😉 Is surely has a special way of carrying messages of emotions and painting pictures while taking us away from whatever we are doing at the moment. Yes, we must not forget the language of other living things – and I didn’t above. On the other hand, no other living thing as we know it comes close to the intricacies of human language. Your comment about mostly hearing French fascinates me – especially knowing where you live. Very interesting! Enjoy your Sunday!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. You’ve given the science of linguistics a run for their money.😏 Yes, there are many ways that nature communicates. Pheromones being one. Other chemicals that trees send via mycorrhiza, etc. But like others, I agree that music is up at the top of the list.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Language is so complex, so huge and so all encompassing. It is also so incredibly intimate. It keeps us together and it drives us apart, it is also one of the most generous and humourous abilities we have.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. You packed lots of thought-provoking ideas in this post, Frank, so I’m busy thinking rather than using language. 🙂 Just a thought that came to mind about language, the old adage that “What you do speaks so loudly that I can’t hear what you say.” Sometimes the unspoken word or action is much louder that any other sort of language.
    I’m currently reading an autobiography of Frederick Forsyth (The Outsider) and he mentions that you may learn another language perfectly but you’ll still usually stand out if you don’t know the idioms.

    Just some random thoughts about language. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet,
      Many thanks for the random thoughts. Human language is extremely complex because it is much more than words. Heck, we see the words in a text, but so much seems missing that those words can easily be misinterpreted. Plus, I’m also with you about the messages that actions take. Yes, actions are stronger than words … or as I say … The true meaning of a person is through what they do, not what they say. After all, we know the two often conflict. Yep – and all of us have been guilty of that. Thanks for sharing!

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  10. Hi Frank, what a thought provoking post. Certainly language is more about words, it’s a form of existence isn’t it. From music, nature and so many styles of communicating, even the signs we get from animals, language is all around us. Wonderful post!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I like that there are so many different languages. Now we humans perhaps need to learn to respect and honor all the different languages being spoken and listen more closely to them for common ground.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Laurie,
      Music is quite the language. It comes in so many different forms. Each person has favorite music, but favorites aren’t the same. However, those of us like you and I who have a wide range of musical tastes understand its power and magic. Thanks for walking along and sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Another fine walk, Frank, with lots of things to think about. You know, it’s quite amazing how we all can approach understanding and communicating with others, despite language differences, if we’ll be patient and try. I’m thinking about people who travel to foreign lands yet don’t speak the language … or our pups who work extra hard to figure out what we’re asking of them!

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  13. Wow Frank, you really went above and beyond on this one! I thought only of the spoken word when I first started reading and then wowza, you really explored such a wide range, I was upset with myself for my narrow vision! Very well done my friend.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Tina,
      Thank you for the praises and glad to broaden you perspective. Keep in mind this was volume 2 about language … volume 1 had more about written and spoken language. I must say that some comments here have inspired volume 3, and the draft is well on the way! Thanks for walking along.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. It may take you several volumes to get through all the nuances of language, Frank. You covered it quite well. Since I posted about pets today, I think about the language we “speak” to our pets, and what they understand. I read that dogs have the intelligence of 5 year old children, meaning they have a vocabulary of about 100 words they understand. Remarkable! Love the video–anything by Lauren Daigle is amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Terri,
      Thanks for the encouraging comment about this walk & the video. I’m careful in my hunt for the concluding video, so the fact you enjoyed it makes me smile. You mentioning pets made me laugh thinking about pets. Although I think they know certain words, they also respond to tone. Say something terrible a nice way, they are happy. “Pets” is on my idea list for a future walk, so time will tell if I do it. Have a good week.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. There are so many facets to language, Frank. It’s a fascinating subject. The language of nature needs no words, neither does the one of music – both of these are universal in all its many forms.
    Words, there are those who are magicians with the written word, people like Marc and Holly and Merril and my new favourite author Beryl Markham (to name but a few). They are able to evoke such imagery through their prose that it feels a new language is created joining the two. Sigh.
    And The Piano Guys. No way you ever fail when you include my favourite masters of the musical language.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      Language is fascinating. This walk was different than the first walk – and I’ve reviewed the two as I starting drafting volume 3! Some writers have a way with words – a gift – such as the ones you mentioned … and I know my style and skill is nowhere near them. Way outside the ballpark. Glad you enjoyed this one and thanks for strolling along.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m really quite impressed that you have thought of so many different ways to engage with language, Frank. And to think that this is the second installment! Your mention of DNA as the language of all living things really captured my interest. You’ve surely thought of everything. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debra,
      Thank you for your praise. The more I think about language, I know there is more to say without duplicating the first and second. I’ve actually started drafting #3. DNA is fascinating and definitely a language. Someday there will be a walk just about DNA. 🙂 …. and that’s a good thing.

      Like

  17. A beautiful post, Frank. I love your inclusive reflections on the myriad forms of language. Our world is made of interconnected languages that we intrinsically relate to and interpret. We are of this planet, not simply on it, and every part of it speaks to us. A lovely musical piece by Daigle. I listened to it at the end, but next time will go there first so I can listen as I read. 🙂 Thanks for the wonderful post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Diana,
      Thank you for your thoughtful praise. Interestingly, this is the second walk on language. If my memory is correct, after I initially wrote, I felt it was too long, so I divided it into two walks. Honestly, I’m not sure but I think so. I do know that language is deep enough, a third one is in the draft room! Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed the music & thanks for walking along.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Wow – you’ve written about language in so many ways I hadn’t thought of. Music isn’t just a song or a wonderful composition. Music “talks” to us and shows us emotions that sometimes are deep inside. As I’ve gotten older, the language of music affects me like no other. Embarrassingly, when I hear a certain tune – can be anything from classical to rock – tears can spring into my eyes. What a language! I’m writing this as I’m listening to the language of the ocean (on my little winter break). Ahhhh, what a soothing language it is.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam,
      Thanks for the kind words and glad I was able to expand your thoughts on languages. Music as a way of touching us by triggering memories, sparking emotions, painting pictures, or just making us feel good. Yes – what a language – and a universal one! Thanks for walking along and sharing. Oh – there is so much on to say about languages, some comments here have sparked volume 3 for the future.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Contemplating all you’ve written here, aFrank.
    Thoughts of my kids when they were small came to mind when I was reading your post. Hubby and I would speak Spanish so they wouldn’t understand what we were talking about. lol I spoke to them in Spanish from time to time but they refused to learn it. Well … today, they wish they had. Life … and all its complexities.
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Isadora,
      Language offers much to contemplate. So much so, a third beach walk on the topic is already in draft mode. I laughed about how parents would sometimes speak in a different language so others wouldn’t understand. What mine didn’t know is my comprehension was much better than they thought. Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

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