97 – Hidden

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Eyes allow us to see much – the powdery sand, the waves moving toward shore then gliding across the sandy upslope, the blue sky, the shiny sun, and its reflections, plus much more.

When we concentrate and carefully look, we notice so much more. For those who take the time to look, nature offers many wonderful details for us to admire: the designs, patterns, colors – not only here where I walk, but throughout the natural world.

However, today I wonder about the hidden world – the world that we cannot see with the unaided eye. The world that is too small, too far away, too fast, too slow, or even covered, or enclosed, or concealed.

Photo by Cristina Andrea Alvarez Cruz on Pexels.com

The hummingbird’s wings move fast and appear to us as a blur – yet technology can slow the video enough to capture the elegance of the wing motion – to notice similarities and differences with other winged creatures. The same video technology allows us to analyze fast human motions as running, skiing, skating, swinging a golf club, tennis racket, or baseball bat.

At the opposite end of the scale, technology can capture slow movements of massive structures as glaciers and tectonic plates. Motion that we measure in inches or centimeters per year.

As I peer across the sea, the water covers much that is below. Many things are large enough to see with the unaided eye, but they are below the water. We cannot see the mountains, ridges, and canyons below as we stand on the shore – let alone all the aquatic life. The ocean’s depth is a world without light, so our vision is limited. This is a world of yet-to-be-discovered life. This is a world containing the lost-then-found, such as the Titanic and other sunken treasures.

Photo by Emma Li on Pexels.com

As I think about the water covering all below the surface, my mind sees a parallel to what lies below the land’s surface. The life – minerals – signs of humanity’s past are not only below, but also layered with the youngest closer to the top. Technology allows us to see whatever is covered. Then, we may physically expose it for the world to see its past.

Whereas our skin and hair cover the internal world within us, various scans and imagery give medical professionals a closer look. The X-ray shows a bone fracture or a tumor. The MRI visualizes the brain by peeling it layer by layer like an onion. Laboratory tests provide a view of many activities in the blood.

I look at my arm to think about the invisible world that is too small to see with the unaided eye – a world that simple microscopes take us into – the world of single cells. The world of two or more groups of like cells organized into tissues. The world of seeing various parts of a single cell. Parts that work together as a complex machine we know as a life form.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Other technologies take us into the world of atoms and molecules that make up those cell parts. Atoms and molecules in constant motion – let alone comparing the motion of solids, liquids, and gases.

Telescopes allow us to explore the heavens above. That world has expanded with fly-by exploring missions like Voyager, Cassini, and others, which gives us a closer view of our celestial neighbors. I cannot forget the fascinating and mystical view of deep space from the Hubble telescope.

Lagoon Nebula by Hubble Telescope – Credit to NASA, ESA, and STScI

It seems my brain hurts as I think about the hidden world that I cannot see because it is too small, too far away, too fast, too slow, or even covered or enclosed. But all of which technology allows us to see or at least understand. Maybe the hidden world is like a secret – that is, unknown – but unlike a secret, one to be known.

Hidden can also be a message, talent, door, or agenda. We can also have a hiding place or rely on the fog or night to make something hidden. But for me,, thinking involves making connections to help me understand and wonder about the world. Both of which are important as I walk the beach. After all, I like walking on the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

See what other bloggers have posted about hidden

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88 thoughts on “97 – Hidden”

  1. love this Frank. The hidden eye only sees so much until you can’t see. Hard to witness my dad going blind. This is wonderful. Even without opening my eyes, i can close them and feel the music of the blue skis. Nice job!💖💖💖🙏

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I am comforted by the hidden world, knowing there is so much more out there than the human mind could ever comprehend. It means that life goes on, that our universe is indestructible and will keep on keeping on long after we leave the earth.

    As for the Hummingbird, its wing lie on the opposite end of the spectrum from my running . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marc,
      I appreciate your point about the hidden world comforting your thoughts about the world. Whereas many say (and have said for a while) that Mother Earth is weakening – well, we are getting her sick – but to me, Earth is strong, and will make adjustments to survive. If that includes wiping out some life in the short term, so be it. Enjoy your running!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Marina,
      You’ve given a great recommendation to people to discover the world by opening up their senses. Yes – truly a way to discover the hidden! One can’t find something if they don’t take time to look!!! But I also see that searching to explain the unknown is something that science does because research is at a much different level than everyday life. Yamas!

      Like

  3. A thought-provoking post, Frank. There’s hidden, but you only know something was hidden after you find it.
    So much in the universe we can’t see, both the tiny and the huge but far away. But then, sometimes while walking one uncovers treasures. For example, flowers or mushrooms behind a rock–hidden until you step off a path, or a bird in a tree hidden by the leaves, but then it sings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Merril,
      You are right on. In everyday life – taking the time to look brings forth hidden treasures. Many hidden treasures are to be found – and your examples are wonderful! Then again, technology brings the hidden world to another level … and researchers go even deeper. Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. This is great, Frank. I am reminded of the book, “Powers of Ten” in which they study a square in a Chicago park (inwards and outward). So many aspects ot the universe around us they we never see.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dan,
      The first time I saw the Power of Ten video (many years ago) I was instantly fascinated … and I’m with you because this walk fits that thought. Although I honestly don’t recall, but I would not be surprised if the Powers of Ten was in my head when I wrote this. Just found the original video on YouTube … dated 1977 … here it is for you and others to see. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fKBhvDjuy0&t=402s …. thanks for the reminder, Dan!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you for this journey through the marvelous hidden worlds technology now reveals to us! Makes me wonder what new things we will discover as time goes on. Our endless curiosity keeps us looking for more than we can see with the naked eye…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Barbara,
      Yes, yes, yes! Taking time to look to find the hidden journey with our own eyes is one thing, but a variety of technologies also reveal the hidden world. Sometimes that technology is available for most of us – but other times we just need to take the time to watch it on a video or a show – let alone, learning more. Great thoughts, Barbara. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This is why I always scan my potential girlfriends with a radio telescope. I’m not so much worried about radio waves emanating from her; but, if she’s one of the lizard people, I’d like to know in advance so I don’t take her ice skating.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I have to tell you, Frank. This is the best written post of the series. I loved it. It is fascinating to discover things that are hidden from us unless we look with special equipment. It proves to us just how small we are in the grand scheme of things. Like Marc, it comforts me to know that there is a whole world beyond what we see – and I’m talking within our planet.
    Lovely choice of song, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      Scrolling through and I wonder how I missed your comment. Shame on me! Identifying this one as a favorite is high praise – so thanks. I intentionally tried to cover the range of “minuscule to massive” (thanks Tina) in a short time. … and to think their is much more that can be written about hidden. I would be surprised if I turn some of the comments into Hidden v2. Thanks for the thoughts! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I do that too. (Scroll through to make sure I didn’t miss anyone.) Especially now that the notification pane acts up. No shame on you.
        I just like the way you wrote it. It had a lovely flow to it.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Yes, I see many things are hidden.
    Yes, technology is helping us to see these things. It’s wonderful!
    I wonder if technology will ever be able to see the secrets and loves hidden in my/our hearts?
    Fab post, thank you Frank!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Another complex subject beautifully explored Frank. From minuscule to massive the world is a marvelous place just waiting to be explored. We are fortunate to live in a time when it is so much more visible that it was to those who came before us. One wonders how much more we humans will be able to see in the future if today’s trajectory continues. When I first started in the computer business we talked about halving and doubling every year (twice the power to half the price). Technology has brought so much more understanding of what came before us and what remains to be discovered. I’m holding onto hope that very soon the fountain of youth will be an actuality!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Tina,
      Thanks for sharing your thoughtful insight about hidden. You mentioning doubling-time reminded me of the growth in knowledge through the ages … and technology is allowing the doubling time for the body of knowledge to get shorter and shorter … and as you put it, this is happening from the minuscule to the massive. I still remember my dad visiting me in the 1980s. We were in a car and he said, it’s going to be some world in another 50 years. (He lived another 25-30 years) … The hidden world that is visible to us today that wasn’t available 50 years ago is amazing. Cheers to your thoughts and thanks for the kind words.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. This is such an amazing and unique topic that you made so enjoyable with your Beach walk reflections! There is so much more to our eye available because of the technologies, the microscopic, the vast, the deep and the far beyonds. And yet there is so much more beyond where we could reach with our eye, to know, to see, to understand. Very fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. PD,
      Thank you very much. I’m going to steal Tina phrase as I tried to go “from the minuscule to the massive” because the hidden is in both directions … and let us not forget below the surface or behind/under a rock. Everyone can discover more of the hidden by tapping into their senses … let alone diving into learning. Glad you enjoyed this stroll!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Donna,
      I saw your comment, but suddenly realized I didn’t respond! Shame, shame, shame on me. Cheers to singing along with Macy … and I await your report on the Battle Cranberry Sausage Spaghetti. It’s different – but I’m happy you took the adventure.

      Like

  11. As you point out, some things are in plain sight, but remain hidden to our awareness until we seek it out. We can’t wait to find out what’s hidden in the color fully wrapped packages under the Christmas tree – they scream to uncover their secrets. It takes a more curious mind to peel open a juniper berry or a plant fall. To dissect a flower to identify its species, to look under the auto hood and wonder what the heck happened to all those parts I used to be able to work on myself. It’s a mystery!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Eilene,
      The hidden aspect of wrapped packages under the Christmas tree is a wonderful example not only hidden – but also how one’s awareness of their presence creates anticipation and excitement. I like your thought about applying that example to other situations. Perfect! Your comment about car engines made me laugh. I’m not a mechanic or one who tinkers with them, but simple observation makes your point. Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I understand when you say it all makes your head hurt, Frank! It does mine, as well. I think this is an important post, because we are so quick to only think about what we can see, and we make commitments to feed our rational minds to the point where we forget mystery is there, too. I LOVED these photos, and I think as a topic this is fascinating! The photo of the Lagoon Nebula is powerful, isn’t it? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debra,
      So glad you especially enjoyed this walk. You’ve read enough of my posts through the years to know that I enjoy a topic’s depth. I’m happy with the images, too. They are courtesy of Pexels.com (which has a relationship with WP), except for the Lagoon Nebula (from Hubble Gallery). I’m sure you recall that I used a variety of headers at the old blog that are from Hubble. Images of deep space move me!

      Like

  13. Well, doesn’t this give us a lot to think about! Maybe, some of what is unseen is meant to stimulate our imagination rather than be discovered! I do love to see videos of what lies deep within the oceans. If I was doing my life over again, I would want to learn to scuba dive! –with a camera 😊 And yes, there is so much beauty in the world! Great song!! Nice post Frank!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Lisa,
      Stimulating brain cells is what I like to do. A recent commenter mentioned they had no idea anyone could write that much about something as simple as shadows. Needless to say, that made me smile – and so did your first sentence. I also enjoy videos of life in the sea. Oh, the beauty alone – let alone the details. Glad you enjoyed Macy along with this walk. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Frank, what a post!! Thank you! There is so much within the context of this world we do not know about and that continually fascinates me to no end. I love to explore, to think, to marvel. Worlds within worlds and the more I step deep into Mother, the hidden becomes seen. I absolutely loved this post!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Fascinating topic, Frank! Yes, there’s much we’ve learned as a species, but there’s so much more that remains hidden. And that probably keeps us on our toes, don’t you think, as we try to uncover secrets hidden in our universe?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debbie,
      I’m with you about learning. Take anything – a sugar maple tree – an acorn – an Amoeba … there is so much to learn about them that it is like a bottomless pit. Then again, we individuals don’t need to know everything about everything. Now take that thought and apply it to the universe …. oh wow! Both magnificent and wonderfully overwhelming. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. These days when I think of hidden I think of powerful emotions that are not readily decipherable. Far too many are rooted in pain, sorrow, anger and grief. Some people are clever enough to disguise the hidden which compounds its presence. Great music and accompanying images as always, Frank.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Monica,
      What a brilliant thought! In the words of Billy Crystal, Marvelous. Simply marvelous. The thought of hidden emotions didn’t come to me, so I thrilled that you mentioned it because it so true – and each of us encounter it daily …. and from both sides of the fence. Many THANKS for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. My mind sees what is hidden and those things turn up in my dreams and imagination. I love that they are not concrete things, that they manage to stay unconfirmed because the mystery is what makes them interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. hidden until found. I love taking macros shots. And in photos you can see so many hidden things you did not notice until you look closely at what you have shot. hidden in our minds memories that emerge at night, in art or when listening to music. intersting read.

    Like

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