99 – Communities

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Community is an interesting word – a word with multiple meanings – a word used differently by biologists, sociologists, and the general population.

I’m confident the initial thought for most people fits into the sociological word. In the biological world, a community is a group of different populations of organisms living and interacting together.

Photo by Los Muertos Crew on Pexels.com

The lake community is made of different fish, turtles, insects, frogs, algae, single-celled organisms, plants, and more – all living and interacting together in various food chains interwoven into a more complex food web. All the smallmouth bass in a specific lake form a population – not a community – but the lake community is composed of many populations.

There is a biological community on this beach that I walk, although I don’t know enough about the organisms here. Another community exists within the shallow water. Different communities exist with changing depths and distances from shore.

Whereas in terms of biology, we humans are one population of the same species – Homo sapiens. Yet, we relate to sociological communities – a group of people identifying themselves in a common spirit.

I think of the main (but different) communities in my current life – my neighborhood, my dance friends, my church, the golf club where I work, my golf league – all are groups of different people with common interests. Work and hobbies also unite people into communities.

Photo by Laurens den Besten on Pexels.com

I grew up in a small town that would be more of a community than a small city. However, my small town had neighborhood communities: Sugar Run, Mulberry Heights, Lincoln Heights, Naylor’s Run, Kerr’s Run, and more.

I think about the community of my nearby neighbors in my small town. We kids within a few streets who played together – and the parents who knew each other. Parents would watch over all of us while we played – or even provide a snack to the group. It seems those days are not only gone, but I question if they will ever return.

A college campus is a distinct community within a municipal community. The two interact in a variety of ways, yet are each is quite distinct.

I think about the wave of immigrants who left their homeland to find a new life in America and other countries throughout the world. Many lived in the same neighborhood, some of which live on today in areas known as Little Italy, Germantown, Chinatown, Greektown, and others.

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

I think about other types of communities today where people gather for support around a common interest – LGBT, a variety of personal support groups, groups for hobbyists as knitting, modern trains, Civil War reenactments, wine, and many more. Let us not forget the political communities – groups of like-minded people around an ideology.

Technology has created electronic communities. Facebook connects a social network as a way to keep in touch with people you know. Blogs have fostered new connections of people who didn’t know each other and may never meet – yet join together to form a community of common interests, support, and genuine respect. Technology has fostered the term virtual communities. So yes, technology and travel have brought the world community closer.

As I walk the beach on this day, I can’t forget the snowbird communities found here and throughout the southern US. Snowbirds – mainly retired people from northern locations who migrate to the south for warmer temperatures during winter. Snowbirds know that no matter how cold it gets here, it is warmer than home.

All the above and more is the world of communities. Just think, all these communities share one planet.

I enjoy being a snowbird and being part of the snowbird community. I also like walking the beach because walking the beach is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

See what other bloggers have posted about communities

Next Post: Good – Wednesday 22 December @ 1 AM (Eastern US)

110 thoughts on “99 – Communities”

  1. The workplace is also like a small community…and the facility where I work is like a large family…or a very small community. Where my parents lived for about tem years was a complex of 6 apartment buildings, 2 nursing homes, and many affiliated services such as a store, a bank, a PT room, a church (Yup, a fully functional sanctuary! My son even played the organ and piano in there years ago!), and two hair salons…among others. All the buildings are interconnected by tunnels, and you could get lost in them…or you can go outside to walk to the various buildings. It’s a city unto itself, a community!
    (When this place was completed it was the only such place for seniors, who could live independently, with some assistance or with full care. When my parents were there, before the 6th apartment tower was built, I heard them say the population was nearly 1000! Not including all the staff…)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ingrid,
      Oh my … you are in one of those places! (I say that in a big way and with a smile.) It’s definitely a community … and I like your linking an aspect of community to a large family. Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the work you do. Thanks for being part of my community.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Jo,
      Thank you for being part of my blogging community. I know this is true for me, but when you started blogging, did you expect a blogging community to be what it is? About that video. Recall We Are the World of many stars singing? I believe a Michael Jackson project.

      Like

  2. You got me thinking about Rachel Carson’s book, “The Edge of the Sea.” Have you read it? I am in the midst of it (reading it slowly but surely, as the mood strikes). There are so many communities at the edge of the sea. And, as you have wonderfully pointed out, so many different communities in life. I enjoyed the walk and your thoughts. Thank you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I enjoyed thinking about those days when we would play in neighborhood yards or the street and mothers across the community would watch over us. Snacks, warnings, reprimands and more than a few bandaids were handed out. I enjoy the online community I have found, but I miss those times. Like you, Frank, I doubt they will ever return.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nicely penned Frank! And thanks for including my post in your post. 🙂 I like the many definitions you explore. For me, community has taken on a deep meaning, where the company I’m keeping are linked, so to say, in heart and spirit. That can include Spirits from all of the communities on this amazing planet. It’s a wonderful feeling to share with such a group.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Harold,
      Welcome to the sands of my contemplative, yet friendly breach – and thanks for taking the time to provide a very thoughtful comment. Love the idea that a community is linked in heart and spirit. Wish I would have that of that idea. But as you elude to, that link isn’t necessarily tied to a distinct location – but one that can be global. Truly an excellent thought.

      Also, a special thank you for your post. After all, if you wouldn’t have penned it, I wouldn’t have found it! WEll done! Where are you located on our blue orb in space? I’m in Cincinnati Ohio USA.

      Like

  5. true, your childhood memories were similar to mine, I lived in a small community of family houses, that was surrounded by areas with apartment houses. the area we lived in all the kids, young and older, boys and girls played together. It was safe. great way to grow up. thanks for bringing it back. Our blogging community has opened many views and places to me, thanks for being part of it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ritva,
      Thank you for sharing a bit of your personal story. Interesting how our stories are similar, yet grow up on different continents and never imagining that a cyber world would link us in the future. Yes, blogging has opened the world to many of us. Thank you for being part of my blogging community! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. We can get lost in the many types of communities there are now and in the past. I think the “closest” community I ever lived in was the Air Force base in Alabama where my Dad was stationed in the late 50s/early 60s. Quarters were in single long parallel buildings divided into homes for 4-5 families. There was an alleyway between buildings and at night everyone would sit out in the alley – kids played, parents talked, lots of laughs, games, cookouts…..but moving every 2 years made us feel like we were just barely EVER part of a community other than the “military one”. I learned about all kinds of communities when I was out on my own. Communities around hobbies, religion, friendships. Bloggers are a great community – I think of how important it can be to those who are homebound for instance. It’s your whole world. Thanks for making me THINK about communities……lots of good memories.

    Pam

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Frank, an inspiring and heartwarming post! I love it. ❤ "We are the World" is so timely. I looked at all the familiar faces delivering a message of global community. Many of them are no longer with us. Thank you for bringing their voices back. Wishing you joy, now, and in the coming year! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cheryl,
      You got me wondering – so I looked it up – We Are the World is from 1985 – that’s 36 years ago! Interesting that you mentioned a nostalgic view of the video (whereas I tapped into the community aspect) – but now I need to watch it again! Thanks for sharing your thoughts and the role you play in my community.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. beautiful reflections Frank to wake up to Frank. I’m grateful for your well thought out reflections and heart and being in community together here. Such a beautiful song. I remember those faces so beautiful with so much hope and talent. Have a bright beautiful day my friend!
    💖

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cindy,
      One of the reasons I use a 1 AM Eastern US posting time is so the post can be for a morning read starting with the European friends – so the fact it also worked for you today on the west coast brightened my day! For me, the video and song fits my theme for this walk. Cheryl’s comment got me to watch it again thinking about those entertainers today. Sadly – some have passed. Glad to brighten your day and thanks for brightening mine and being part of my community.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh got it.. and I try to do by a.m. for whatever reason and am contemplating posting something right now because I’ve been so swamped. It’s probs not best but I may give it a whirl. Glad it brightened my day.
        It was a perfect match Frank!
        Loved it~!!! You’re so welcome it sure did and truly happy as well! about that as well. 💖

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Eugi,
      Each of us are members of multiple communties and a different combination for each of us. It’s possible that you are I have nothing in common in terms of communities or a lot …. then again, it could be something in between. More importantly, thanks for sharing and being part of my community.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Frank, you’re certainly right about it being warmer along the coast than in the Midwest (even though today here is on the warm side!). Once that snow starts falling, we’ll be stuck here for a while, whereas down South, it can snow in the morning and melt by afternoon. I enjoyed your thoughts about communities!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debbie,
      As I’ve said many times before, no matter how cold it gets at the my beach, it’s warmer than my northern home. … and I’ve only seen snow in that area several times – and that was on TV. Meanwhile, I’m still in Ohio, and yes – hweeeeee doggie …. today was a warm day for mid-December! Thanks for being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. With the panDAMNic continuing to hang around, I find I’m even more grateful for the community of bloggers who swing by the Ranch. Without the connections we’ve made over the years, I often wonder how I could have gotten by this past year and a half. You guys have no idea how much you have buoyed my darkest moments with your gentle support. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Monika,
      Well done linking the blogging community and the pandemic. Travel was limited – Events were cancelled – Groups limited – yet the blogging community kept cranking away and stayed connected. Cheers to that! Thanks for sharing, Monica – and for being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Cincy,

    I never watched the show “Community”, but I did take a night course in Japanese at a community college nearby. So I guess I’m even. And thank you to Tennessee Community College for being the homecoming game for Alabama next season as the SEC power pads its record for yet another title run!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. John,
      Excellent example of community that is so good, I wish I would have included it! Not only timely, we see this over and over again with many natural disasters. Besides, those are also times when the community of humanity steps up. Thanks for being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Jo,
      The blogging community is unique because it’s electronic. I’ve been blogging since 2008, and I can count the number of bloggers that I’ve interacted with on one hand. Community pride at the local level is a good addition because it shows up in a variety of ways. Thanks for being part of my community.

      Like

    1. Laurie,
      To me, there is no doubt in my mind humanity is built for community. Not only are we social creatures, the depth of our emotions as love and empathy creates that community – which then also makes its way into the blogging community. Thanks for sharing and being part of my community.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. There really are so many different sorts of communities, Frank, and you touched on many of them. I guess all of us reading and commenting are happy to be part of the blogging community. I’m looking forward to finding another church community because I really miss the one in Illinois and our community of friends there. I’m glad you enjoy your snowbird community so much and your beach community. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet
      You mentinoed something that I didn’t. Moving is a double-edged sword – one of leaving old communities behind – but also the excitement of finding new communities. All communities are different and unique – so placing an old one with a new one isn’t easy – and sometimes the prior community won’t be replaced but replacing it with something better can happen. Good luck with your search, and thanks for being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I speak a lot about community when I think of the different groups I belong to or support, but I hadn’t fully thought through how expansive the meaning really is! I have considered, however, that for many, if not most of us, our varied communities are suffering because of the difficulties in gathering together under Covid restrictions. I’m hopeful we’ll experience some mending in the new year. Lovely post, Frank.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debra,
      Yes – community has a broad application to we humans. Humans are not only social creatures, we have a very wide rage of emotions that we share with others – now add a layer of empathy people show with others. There’s no question of the effect of COVID on community. Not only the effect on the community, but also on that communities individual members. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and for being a long-time member of my blogging community.

      Like

  14. Hi Frank – I enjoyed the different takes on community – especially the vast mystery of the black community and in the shallow water – it is amazing how there is so much more than what we just see on a glance

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yvette,
      There is no question about the multitude of communities found in nature. Oh my, the mere thought is overwhelming. Then again, my biology background influences that thought. … Even human communities seems endless to me. I also think about people who seek community, but can’t find it for whatever reason. After all, some communities exclude or are not as accepting. Thanks for being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Frank – I am so glad to be part of your blogging community and when you take your breaks it makes me realize how much we value your contributions – and in some ways -the breaks make me appreciate your posts more

        and sadly, so many churches are excluding and they don’t even realize it.
        Philip Yancey opened one of his books by talking about a young lady who was in trouble and needy – he asked her if she went to the church on the corner – and with a curled lip and disgust vibe on her face she replied, “The church – why would I go there?”
        and his point was that the church is not as inviting or the open community it could or needs to be
        Sadly so many are “country clubs” for the “tithers” and I have seen most offer “less community” with a lot of rudeness –
        anyhow, some of them do offer community and that is good news – and I guess we humans have to find what we need and be patient

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Thank you for the kind words. I try to be authentic with hopes of stimulating thoughts in someone. Best part is that different people will think about different things. 🙂 I’m a church goer – but one thing that I’ve noticed is that the majority of the time (it seems), the members are very inviting to visitors & newcomers. That’s sad. Smaller congregations are probably much better at it than larger ones. This also confuses me too – that is, the community needs to be extended, and the community members play a very important role in that happening!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Hi Frank – I think smaller churches can vary too – and it really just depends – eh?
            and it reminds me that churches are just filled with imperfect people – and on another note, I am a firm believer that “we are the church and we bring our sanctuary with us” and where two or more are gathered, God is there with us. That is good news. We do have a need for churches as institutions – oh yes – and so often they are the ones helping during natural crises and all that – but sometimes the church body can get lost in religiousity or just busy work – hmmm
            but I trust that God has it all in control and will lead, feed, and guide.
            __
            Also, I checked out that quiet chaos art and it was so colorful –
            I do not always get to check out your extra links at the end of posts but was able to today (and If I already said that please. edit this comment – I was writing to you earlier and had some glitches –
            better now
            __
            🎄🎄🎄

            Like

  15. Electronic communities, never considered that one before. I’m always talking about my blogging friends and now I realize that I’m part of a blogging community. Love that thought. I like how you show we can be members of many different communities at the same time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Barbara,
      Electronic communities are important to humans because we are social creatures. Think about the positive side of Facebook. It’s a way people connect, reconnect, and stay connected. High school or college friends who have seen each other in many years because they have scattered to many different locations. I really believe most of humanity naturally seeks community. Thanks for being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. And we bloggers are a fantastic community! (After I wrote this I realized probably several other people said the same). But isn’t it great? I wish all of us in the world would realize that we’re all one big community, here to find and share love, and to take care of our planet. And to be kind. A kind community is the answer to so many things!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam,
      Many have mentioned the blogging community. I believe that aspect is the most unexpected positive of blogging that I didn’t anticipate when I started. I’m confident that I’ve encountered bloggers who found a community through blogging to fill a void in their life – the homebound because of a condition – those living in a very rural/remote location – and I’s sure the list can go on. You also eluded something that I don’t think I did – the global community. Imagine world of respect and cooperation – a world working together for common solutions for the good of us. Unfortunately, reality tells me that is more of a wish. Thanks for sharing and being part of my blogging community.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Frank,

    When you weren’t blogging, I missed you. You were gone from our blog community.
    You have a way of getting under my/our skin.
    Are you Snow Birding this winter?

    Whatever you are up to, have fun!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Resa,
      You have truly touched my heart with this comment. I read this yesterday, but was unable to reply until this morning – but your words stuck with me. It just so happens I was a bit melancholy thinking about several in-person interactions causing me to scratch my head – and then you come in with a comment that lifts me. I can’t thank you enough for that and for being part of my blogging community both here and at aFa. … You asked about snowbirding. It is absolutely on calendar – I hope will be a season of drafting another batch of future beach walks!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Such an interesting post, Frank. Our communities are so important to us. I’m sure that COVID has split some communities apart and also brought others closer together. We are all part of a huge tapestry which is being woven and yet unraveled at the same time. It really is the ‘survival of the fittest’ and yet those in that category are so necessary to ensure that the weaker ones in our community are able to pull through the really tough times. Thank you for sharing your thoughts yet again. 🤗

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sylvia,
      For me, you touched much about the human community. Then again, I know that you have not only moved – you have made BIG moves! Each time leaving personal communities behind. Each time going to a place where you had no or limited community. Each time building a new community. Because of that experience and your personal travels, you realize something bigger – I love your words – “We are all part of a huge tapestry which is being woven and yet unraveled at the same time.” … Brilliant – absolutely brilliant! Thank you for sharing and thanks for being part of my blogging community for a long time.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Community is something dear to my heart and the way I have lived my life. Different communities at different times, but communities that provide warmth, support and care. A few years ago we moved to a new community after being long term residents of the former, where we knew everyone. However, that community was changing and we with it. I am very happy in my new community and feel like we should have made the move earlier.
    Lovely beach walk, Frank and when I go to the beach, I don’t swim much, but I relish walking along the beach in the cool early morning just along the water’s edge! Fantastically therapeutic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Amanda,
      Thanks for the kind words. You made me smile this morning because “therapeutic” is one of my goals. Thanks for sharing your thoughts about moving – that is, changing communities. We were in our previous home for 27 years. Even with the mixture of emotions, we were ready to move. Cheers to you being able to go to the beach!

      Like

  20. Communities are what bind us together. My preschool class is a community. You describe all communities so well, from big to small, and how important they are to our belonging. Well done, Frank!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I dislike when a message gets lost in my community of emails, Frank, like this one did! There are hundreds of communities and I enjoyed your discussion of their interconnectedness in various ways. We really enjoy our new community of Nine Mile Falls. My hubby got Christmas gifts after working all week as a sub in facility maintenance at the local high school. He couldn’t believe it. It’s these little things that demonstrate our move to Eastern WA was the right move (as we knew it would be). I’ll be on a short blogging break after 12/23, but I do want to contribute to a beach walk. I’ll PM you with my thoughts! Meanwhile, have a Merry Christmas and peaceful start to your New Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Terri,
      “Community of emails” made me laugh. Thanks for sharing the wonderful story about hubby working as a maintenance sub. I’m with you about the role and importance of little things making a community. Moving isn’t easy – so cheers to the two of you for making it work. Thanks for giving me the heads up about your interest in a possible collaboration. Although it’s time for the holiday crazies – no rush! Merry Christmas to you and yours!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Oh, how I wish I could walk a beach right now. I agree it is good for the mind, body, and soul. I have a trip to the ocean planned for this spring. In the meantime, I will enjoy your wave sounds and your lovely, thought-provoking words about community. Thanks for sharing this with us, Frank. I hope you are enjoying your holidays!

    Liked by 1 person

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