33 – Storms *

Special thanks to Margaret for being my collaborator for this post. Margaret, from Yorkshire, UK, hosts From Pyrenees to Pennines, an eclectic blog focusing on life, travel, and photography. I didn’t know Margaret from the old blog, but she’s been a regular visitor here since I started Beach Walk Reflections. She’s welcoming and with a sense of humor, so I encourage you to stop by her blog – and tell her I sent you.

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like walking on the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Even though a storm is approaching, the sky can still be blue – but the sea may be agitated.

Today is not one of those days. In advance of a storm front due to pass in mid-afternoon, clouds dominate the sky. They are not a solid mass – but very irregular showing a seemingly unlimited spectrum of gray. The clouds saturate the sky as ritual smoke as they move to their cosmic dance.

Scant patches of blue periodically appear as holes leading to a greater beyond. Sometimes, an opening aligns with the sun to shine light on me. Other times the sun transforms a puffy cloud into a brilliant white aerial statue.

The wind is stronger today as it assists me in my eastward walk – but I know it will provide resistance on my return trip.

The winds travel across the water’s surface creating ripples for as far as I can see. I look at the thick clouds above whose lower surfaces appear as ripples caused by the same wind. There must be a connection.

The sea is more agitated than yesterday’s placidness. Red flags at beach entrances warn visitors of riptide currents, yet the sea is far from the fury whose tempest took ships to their unexpected but permanent mooring on the ocean floor.

The storm is not yet here – and may or may not live up to forecasted expectations. The clouds serve as a blanket of anticipation – but not a positive one because they display a haunting gloom of the approaching afternoon worry.

Storms make people anxious – just as the difficulties, trials, and tribulations do in life. Personal storms tend to weaken fragile foundations, but those with a strong cornerstone survive and come forth with strength and wisdom.

It’s also interesting how storms are symbolic in life. After letting the storm build in them, a person is storming mad, so they storm into a room to take a meeting by storm – storm around kicking up a storm, then storm out. All this is very different from dancing or singing up a storm.

We also know that when a storm is brewing – even in a teapot – but any port in a storm may be necessary for safely riding out the storm.

But the storm approaching the area is about the weather – not personalities. The approaching storm is not a hurricane – after all, it is not hurricane season. I have never been in or near a hurricane, but that’s not an experience that I want to add to my resume of life experiences.

The approaching storm may not be a hurricane, but it may have an eye – but in the form of tornadoes. Those sudden bursts of energy are angry eyes of destruction that nobody wants to see.

The approaching storm makes me wonder about not only its turmoil but the calm on the other side – even the possibility of a rainbow.

For now, I don’t worry. I enjoy this time and walking on the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

See what other bloggers have posted about storms

Next Post: Rainbows – Thursday 26 January @ 1 AM (Eastern US)

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122 thoughts on “33 – Storms *”

    1. Yvette,
      Isn’t interesting how a rainbow can appear after a storm? Of course, it doesn’t happen every time, but when it does, its appearance is like a sign of hope – a sign that everything is going to be all right. Glad you enjoyed 40 Fingers. For me, I can hear a storm in the storm in that music. Besides, I always appreciate comments about the music!

      Like

    1. Cindy,
      Ah ha … being on the west coast you have discovered you can end your day with a beach walk while the Europeans can start their day with one. Storms can be violent, but I wanted to bring a sense of peace with this topic. Glad you enjoyed the Storms rendition by 40 Fingers. I take pride in my selection for the closing videos, and happy when I receive comments about it. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Storms are interesting to watch….from afar, as it rolls and roils in…and scary when they crash their thunders overhead…such power unleashed, and a mere men we have no control over them at all. We can fly to the moon, do delicate surgeries to help sick peeps, do organ transplants, but we cannot ever control any storms.
    Though at least we can know they are coming…more or less!
    Loved that Vivaldi video!
    Beethoven also composed a storm movement in his 6th symphony.

    And there used to be pieces composed about storm and stress, I studied some of those little bits when I was taking violin lessons…eons ago! Can’t play a thing anymore these days, too much arthritis in my neck and hands…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ingrid,
      Thanks for the myriad of thoughts. Absolutely LOVE your words about human accomplishments and the uncontrollable power of storms. Perfect … and thank you.

      Cheers to your love for music. No longer playing doesn’t hamper the joy and appreciation for it. Thanks for mentioning Beethoven’s storm – and for those who want to hear it, here’s the link. https://youtu.be/9PrbLsQ_g7s

      Like

  2. Yet again your eclectic range of thoughts make for interesting reading: and thanks for calling me your collaborator. All I did was provide a few snapshots! Just off to mention you on my post before I -er – post it.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Rudi,
      Perfect insight. After all, there are storms and there are STORMS. The hard rains with a few claps of thunder don’t compare to hurricanes, tornadoes, and others … and as another comment mentioned, their power is uncontrollable – so yes, let us hope we are spared. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

  3. I really love this one, Frank! Not least for your collaboration with Margaret 🙂 🙂 I recognise episodes she has talked about in those photos. And the video is superb. Very much my kind of thing. In fact, I might bank this one 🙂 🙂 Oh, and I almost forgot to mention your contribution- the clouds in their cosmic dance and all those storms in a teacup! Nice one, Frank!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jo,
      Glad you enjoyed this combination of my words and Margaret’s photos. I know your connection with her is much longer than mine, so it’s even better that you made connections to her posts. Glad you enjoyed 40 Fingers as I always appreciate it when readers enjoy the closing videos.

      Like

  4. Lovely blog this morning. Storms are interesting ANYWHERE but at the beach, they have a certain electricity to their action. Storms seem to invigorate the water, the wildlife, the clouds – the sound of crashing waves like the clapping of appreciation an audience gives at the conclusion of a particularly uplifting/exciting bit of music. At the conclusion of a storm, the quiet is……………more quiet somehow.

    Pam

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam.
      I’m with you .. storms are interesting … well, the reasonable ones. I can’t believe I didn’t mention this, but on the first day of our first extended stay at the beach, we arrived on a rainy day that got worse. As we were unpacking, I turned the TV on for weather alerts. Oh boy – then went to a protected area in the lobby! While our storm passed, that night delivered a wonderful light show … a long one of a large storm out to see … and we just sat on the balcony and watched for a long time. Thanks for reminding me!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Those light shows over the ocean are spectacular…..We arrived in Maine on one of our vacations some years ago in the middle of a bad storm. The hotel lost electricity but everyone gathered in the dining room and they had wine and cheese and what amounted to an impromptu “storm party”. Fun memory.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. There’s something exhilarating about seeing a stormy sea–as long as it’s not too dangerous. No tornados or hurricanes–I don’t like scary storms–but to see a rainbow at the end is something special.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Storms can be great equalizer’s. A storm doesn’t care if you’re happy or sad it is only interested in moving forward. Maybe we can learn something from that. After we pick up the pieces that can often be left by the storm.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. There’s something about a storm that is so EXCITING, isn’t there? Walking on the beach while the clouds roll in and the waves enlarge and the sounds escalate – makes the heart race. I think about the “old days” when weather science wasn’t as advanced as it is now, and people didn’t know that a storm was coming until they saw “the signs. Now, the meteorologist tells us days ahead of time what to expect. Since Saturday we’ve known that we’ll get snow tonight. But I stood on our front porch this morning watching the pinkening dawn in the crisp 17 degree air, listening to the birds, and I wanted to just enjoy this minute, before worrying about the snow storm ahead.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam,
      Great point about the advances in weather forecasting. Still, they love hedging their predictions because it is subject to change.

      Your comment reminds me of a time several years ago. I was out for a beach walk … at least 45 minute away from the condo. I looked out to sea and received an oh-crap moment. I made it back to the condo in record time. Stay warm today!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sometimes “being caught in the rain” is not a bad thing. Can be romantic, if it’s not too cold. 😉 Worse is being caught in the snow, in the car, with a long drive still ahead. For that reason, I’m glad of weather forecasting.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I, too, enjoyed reading about the expressions based on storms. A terrific example of how weather finds it’s way into speech patterns that aren’t only about the weather. As for 40 Fingers…holy cats, what a quartet! I’m a fool for Vivaldi anyway, and their playing was fabulous. Ditto for the setting. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Laurie,
      No kidding about weather and speech – oh my – now that would be an interesting beach walk to ponder. Actually, a mental workout. Whew! Glad you enjoyed 40 Fingers. The music and the setting are what also caught my attention. My ears hear the storm in that music. 🙂

      Like

  9. Yesterday was a stormy day here, with lots of wind, clouds, rain, and rather chilly, much like a spring/fall day in Naperville used to be. Of course they’re getting snow, but… 🙂 There’s something exhilarating about a storm if you’re safe and sound and so many comparisons can be drawn to situations in life, as you and various readers pointed out. Being somewhere where you can watch a storm develop and happen without actually being in it is also a interesting experience. When we drove to the mountains this weekend, the clouds were tremendous and you could almost feel the coming storm. The snowplows with their loads of salt were in position for snow that came a day or two later. We ran into some rain, but the drama of the clouds we awesome. Had to stop for some photos, although in many places there was nowhere to safely pull off the road, so I had to miss a number of shots I would have loved to capture.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet,
      Yes – “something exhilarating about a storm if you are safe and sound” … a perfect thought. Of course, we both know that dealing with a storm of destruction is another matter. Loved the way you described the storm clouds you encountered. You made me think of those crazy storm chasers because we know the clouds are one of the things they watch. On the other hand, I can also see how those same clouds capture the photographic eye of photographers. Thanks for sharing these wonderful thoughts!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Sometimes, a good storm works wonders, doesn’t it, Frank? The rain washes away the cobwebs, so to speak, and clears the air. And just think how the shellers must love wandering the beach and finding what the sea has presented for their surprise!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debbie,
      Your thoughts make me think of those hot, crazy, humid days of summer – the type of weather I don’t like. The days when a storm front comes through to clear out that weather – to give us something new – although possibly only for a day or two. Then there’s the let down of the brief storm that seems to make it worse. YUK! And the shellers must love a storm with the new gems the churning surf brings to the wrack line. Besides, the storm also keep other people off the beach.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Gorgeous shots from Margaret and your words bring them to life, Frank. I wasn’t sure how this collaboration worked so now I have a better idea. I personally haven’t walked along a stormy beach in decades, other than the ones spent in the Sacramento delta as depicted in my last post. Two rivers converge in the delta, a premier windsurfing spot and spring brought amazing clouds, wind and storms. Beautiful videos, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Terri,
      Glad you enjoyed Margaret’s shots and brought attention to her work. She may see your comment, but may not – I simply don’t know her plans. Janet, the collaborator on the previous walk – Rain, interacted with the comments. Like I stated on the Collaborators page, my words with your photos. Meanwhile, I’ve got the feeling the northern California coast can get a few test storms – but probably not as much as Oregon and some of Washington. Storms on the coast are special – well, as long as they are not destructive.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I love storms. Of course, I don’t live by the water so I do not have the same fears as those who do might have. For me, it’s all about sleeping. If it’s storming at night, I sleep like a baby.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marc,
      Normal storms by the water as fine – but no thanks on the massive ones like hurricanes. I don’t any part of that! Once there was an extended light show of an off-shore storm. We sat on the balcony and marvel at the repeated flashes … now that was cool! Cheers to storms sending you into a deeper sleep!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No thank you. The only hurricane I want to see is served up in New Orleans and all you need to drink is one of them. Or the Miami Hurricanes, who should have a good club next season.

        How cool is that? A light show brought to you by nature.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Lovely survey, Frank, including some of our most favorite storm idioms. I’m in awe of how the sky and wind affect the sea and vice versa 🙂 Since childhood I’ve been moved by the lyrics of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from the musical Carousel. “When you walk through a storm…”

    Like

    1. Monika,
      You live in such a unique position. That is pressed against the tall mountains to your west … storm clouds forming along that range, then moving eastward across the plains. That’s a lot to take in! I can recall a time in Colorado Springs – at a hotel near the airport – and watching a storm form and sit over the city, but less impact on us to the east. Very interesting – something I’ve never witnessed. Cheers to you enjoying 40 Fingers!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I can relate to the idea of storms being of 2 kinds, personal and those of nature. Both leave an impact behind, the landscape changes, gets silent for a while until we take steps again. I love being indoors watching a friendly storm through a window. Personal storms don’t seem to be friendly ever I think 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. That video is amazing!!!!!!!!!! Thank you, Frank!
    Now, onto storms. You didn’t sugar coat the possible dreadful outcomes of certain storms.
    Yet, I found this to be your most poetic post to date.
    I think it is the dichotomy between a storm and the still. As you say “the storm and the calm on the other side”.
    Adore this post!
    Of course, the hope of a rainbow.

    Like

    1. Resa,
      Once I found the closing video, I knew I had to use it. For me, I can hear the storms in the music … and I’m not surprised you enjoyed it. 🙂 In terms of the post, thank you. You have been with me a long time, you the way you described what I provided touched m … so thank you! Cheers … clink!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I love watching a storm arrive (of course, I want to be in a safe area!) And man does one sleep well when one does know that one is safe!
    Love Vivaldi. Lovely rendition of Summer (Storm)!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      How we use the term “storms” here has been interesting for me to take in because storms are of different degrees. The typical and much less-threatening thunderstorm at one end and the most violent hurricanes and tornados at the other. I know I never want to experience any form of the violent end of the spectrum = so yes – safety is paramount. Glad you enjoyed a touch of Vivaldi … and those guys can play!

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Me too, in terms of hurricanes. Tornadoes? Well, I’m fair game for those things. A friend of mine in Oklahoma says he never gets used to them. Most homes there do not have basements because the bedrock is too high – so some people (including him) build a storm shelter in the rock. Scary stuff indeed.

          Liked by 1 person

  17. I love the excitement of storms, as long as they don’t get too exciting. The calm before the storm is full of anticipation – there’s a feeling in the air. Living here on the Connecticut shoreline I’ve been through four hurricanes (Gloria-1985, Bob-1991, Irene-2011 and Sandy-2012), and countless tropical storms, but NONE of those impressed my father, who survived the Great New England Hurricane of 1938. He was 16 and walking home from school when it struck without warning.

    I love the wind turbines in the distance in Margaret’s last picture and started wondering about how they hold up in storms. Great photos! I love your description of the sky that precedes a storm. The sea has such a complex relationship with the atmosphere!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Barbara,
      The excitement of storms as long as they don’t get too exciting … that’s a wonderful way of stating what others feel. I don’t think any of us who live inland want to experience the power of the coastal storms. Interesting how your father used the 1938 storm as a point of reference. It’s difficult to imagine a storm like that coming without warning – oh the life before modern technology. You mentioned wind turbines holding up reminds me of this. When we were in Iceland several years ago, we were told that wind turbines cannot without the winds there. Shortly after, we read about a new design that was about to be used in Iceland. Glad you enjoyed Margaret’s photos, which I enjoyed hosting.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m thinking how this pandemic year has been a storm of sorts. How our political climate can be viewed as a storm. We can’t get rid of storms, but we can learn to weather them. Hopefully.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jane,
      I saw the news about the storms in your area. California sure gets its share of extreme weather. Next are the mudslides – then the vegetation growth – then the dry spell, followed by the fires. What a cycle! Good luck out there! Glad you enjoyed Margaret’s photos. The one you mentioned is the one that caught my eye at initiated this collaboration.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I like your idea that a storm can prompt you to think about the possibility of a rainbow. Don’t suppose I’ve ever put that connection together in my brain like that. I love the Vivaldi video. A perfect ending for this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ally,
      Welcome first-time beach walker to my private sands. Glad you enjoyed this walk and it provoked some thinking. That is one of my goals with each walk. Love the fact that you watched and enjoyed the closing video because I put a lot of effort in picking one for each walk. The format for each walk is similar, but the topics change. I invite you to visit some of the past walks.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Storms happen in my country too now… Jusst a few days ago hit some cities… The world is not as we know before… Thank you dear Frank, another beautiful post. Photographs and words and yes these men (40 Fingers) I shared a few days ago Liber Tango from them… Love, nia

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You know dear Frank, a ew years ago I lived in Milano. Before going to there, it was told to me, there was no wind in the city… I went to Milano in August and I stayed to the next year. Really there wasn’t any wind, storm… I felt strange… especially in hot summer days… On the other hand, My Son lives in Baku now. And I learned that Baku means a city with wind… I don’t remember any travel (especially flight) without strong wind… Welcome and Have a nice day, Love, nia

        Like

  21. Storms are super anxiety producing for me. Nope … do not like to be caught in one either.
    I used to love to run around in the rain and jump into puddles of water in play. But, no more.
    I’ll take the sun no matter how hot but it was a pleasure reading all about them, aFrank.
    Be Safe …😷 Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  22. i will indeed make a visit to Margaret’s blog. Nice to know that you’re finding new followers enjoying your beach walks! Years ago I read “The Perfect Storm,” and I’ve never forgotten the description of the ocean’s fury. Powerful!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debra,
      No matter their form, storms are a powerful force. With storms and rainbows being in consecutive posts, I can’t imagine seeing a rainbow after my house has been destroyed. In terms of the new followers, this new blog blog has been a new a surprise and a blessing. … and I think you’ll like Margaret! Tell her I sent you!

      Like

      1. No, our coast of late has been mostly quiet. Sheringham and Cromer are the places to go, but with lockdown I can’t get there. Only takes a strong wind to excite the waves there and have them crashing over the prom.

        Like

  23. Love the images from Margaret and your walking words. I don’t like storms at all – I can watch it in the news…but not out in the open. In 2005 Sweden was hit by the cyclon Gudrun, which had the same strength as a Category 1 hurricane. I will never forget the sound and all the trees coming down. We were among the worst hit in Skåne.

    Wikipedia: “The storm caused significant financial damage in Sweden, where the forest industry suffered greatly from damaged trees, as more than 75 million cubic metres (2.6×109 cu ft) of trees were blown down in southern Sweden. This resulted in Sweden at the time having the world’s largest surplus of lumber.”

    About half a million homes lost power in Sweden and several thousand of these were without power for many days and even weeks in some cases. We were without power for 7 days. Gudrun caused one of the biggest environmental disasters in Swedish history, with 7 people killed, and some in Denmark and Estonia. No good memories at all, and several friends of mine were locked in between fallen trees on their way home. You had to have a chainsaw in your trunk…

    Respect, I have for these natural wonders.

    Like

    1. Leya,
      I can imagine the lumber surplus, but I had no clue about that level of storms reaching your region – although seemingly and thankfully rare. Because storms come in different levels of strength, none of us find enthusiasm and love in damaging storms. Cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons, tornadoes – no thank you. I don’t wish that level of financial and personal damage on anyone Thank you for sharing!

      Like

  24. I thought this was an appropriate topic to link to your comment on Anne Goodwin’s Story Chat coming out tomorrow. I think both women protagonists in the story went through quite a few dangerous storms in their lives. Thanks for sharing on Story Chat, Frank. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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