138 – Rush

Click the video above for 2 minutes of background waves while reading.

I like to walk on the beach. It is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

I do not know why I felt rushed getting to the beach this morning. Was I pushing myself, running late, trying to get started so I would return by a specific time? After all, I walk on the beach to relax and to get away from the pressures and the hectic nature of life.

I don’t know, but maybe that is a sign for my topic to ponder as I walk the sands. Oddly, this is a topic not on my Ideas list. Maybe thinking about rush will calm my soul. But, I don’t want to rush my thoughts, be in a hurry, or act in haste because there is no sense of urgency.

Photo by Vlad Cheu021ban on Pexels.com

I think about how the evolution of the telephone took rush to a new level of urgency. We rushed in the door because of the phone ringing. Even when the phone wasn’t ringing, we rushed in to see if the red light was flashing. Remember that sign of a new message? But that sometimes led to another feeling of a rush – one to return the call.

Then came call-waiting – the service interrupting the conversation by delivering a “got to answer it now” rushed moment to the receiver. Yes, there are important calls to take, but as the person on the other line, I felt annoyed.

I think about cell phones and how they are about now. How many of us began the cell phone age feeling more secure about emergencies? But today, receiving or making a call must be now. After all, we take our phones wherever we go – and when we don’t, a cloud of uneasiness descends upon us.

As I walk, I suddenly chuckle when applying the rushed-now feeling of cell phones to emails, texts, and information at our fingertips – let alone the alerts numerous apps deliver because we are in a rush mode to know now or do it now.

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I think about how email changed our way of communicating. Our past relied on phone calls, postal mail, and hoping to catch someone so we could talk. But with email, we can make contact now – and then call the person five minutes later wondering if they got the message because we want the answer now. After all, isn’t that person in the service to answer us now? Yes, that’s rush.

We rush to the store, so we can rush home. We rush from one thing to the next to check another box on the to-do list. We rush to Amazon for a rush order with next-day delivery. Better yet, just ask Alexa or Siri to order it for us.

We rush through our meals and forget to think about taste. Although we must rush to the hospital for an unfortunate emergency, eating a meal with wonderful wine and good friends is a moment to be savored – not rushed!

Some say we should not rush love and relationships because they are like plants needing nourishment for growth. Besides, if it’s going to happen, it will happen when and if the time is right. Now, I wonder about the relationship between rushed and patience. Is there a zen-ness to controlling rushed moments? On the other hand, I wonder about the Emergency Room doctors and nurses and their rushed feeling and pressure during those crazy-busy times in the ER.

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We want to rush when we have to be somewhere at a designated time. When attending performances such as theater and symphonies, one wants to make sure to leave home by a specific time to allow for travel, possible traffic, parking, and getting seated for a show that typically starts promptly at the designated time. But, when attending a movie theater, we know we have extra time because the movie starts after the 15 minutes or more of advertisements starting at the listed showtime.

I think about the rushed moments when playing handbells. After all, every player wants to strike the correct note and the precise moment. Moving hands to deal with multiple bells, chimes, mallets, and various techniques can be hectic. Yet, I can hear the director saying – Relax – take your time – there is no need to rush because two beats give you plenty of time.

I think about ballroom dance – especially the Foxtrot. Its gliding look requires patience – so the Foxtrot cannot be rushed. The slow step delivers its distinct look and style – a look of elegance.

I tend to be slower than most other males – not rushed. However, I’ve had my share of partners who rush because most of their partners do the same. Being patient with Foxtrot is not easy.

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I stop to face the sea watching a series of waves working their way to the shore, then one-by-one splashing across my feet. Persistent – but not rushed. Each wave in the line allows the one in front to enter my space in an orderly manner. Ahead I see the heron standing stoically still while staring at the sea. The heron never seems rushed, therefore relying on innate patience.

Being retired, I generally avoid the hectic nature of rush-hour traffic. Better yet, being a snowbird away from my normal routine at home is far from rushed. Even better, walking on the beach is a time to relax and not be rushed. This is one reason I like walking on the beach. It is also good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

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84 thoughts on “138 – Rush”

  1. What a beautiful tone to that guitar, Frank! I’m not a very patient person and do my share of rushing out the door , so as not to be late , but I’m quite good at ignoring my tyrant phone, or even, daringly, leaving it at home. Wishing you a happy weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jo,
      Even if patience is not your virtue, not being tied to your phone not only is a good thing, but also a relief when we walk away from it. I had to laugh with your “tyrant” use. Meanwhile, glad you enjoyed the guitar. I felt the video (as a whole) fit this walk .. the relaxing music with the beach scene. Besides, I like that song! Enjoy your weekend!

      Like

  2. Frank, i so agree with your thoughts. Over time, man has forgotten the art of just to be…he seems to always be in a rush, even if he is on a holiday. I have felt myself doing that at times, but consciously allow myself to let go of that mad haste to get things done.

    Thanks for the link to my post. Have a relaxed weekend 💙

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Radhika,
      Thanks for your wonderful post. Once I found it, I knew I had to use it because it paired so well with this walk – and finding others was not easy! Besides, if you didn’t write and post it, I wouldn’t have found it! 🙂 Go go go and now now now seems to be so much of society these days. I like your point – “forgotten the art of just to be” … Well stated!

      Like

  3. Rushing seems to be the word of our time and … if I may say so, the curse of our time too. Everything is rushed to the point that a moment of silence is almost an impossibility! Thank you for the weekend pondering, my friend and cheers to moments of peace regaining ground in our lives!
    Yamas!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marina,
      Rush is a word for our times – and yes – a curse! Then again, many have a getaway – a long walk, reading, painting, cooking, listening to music, and countless other activities that takes one away from the fast-paced world. Cheers to those unrushed moments. Yamas!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. One of the most difficult adjustments I have had to make in retirement is not to be ruled by the tyranny of the immediate. Seven years retired and I am still working on it. Balancing work, home life, and raising children and grandchildren I was always on a schedule, always thinking three steps ahead, and never able to sit for any length of time without thinking what was next. It did not happen automatically when I retired. it is a conscious effort and one I struggle with.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Gary,
      Thanks for the thoughtful example. Our working years are very rushed – especially in the times of work demanding more with less help and less time. Family – too – especially with little ones are involved. Yes, the retirement adjustment is difficult – as is the suddenly becoming an empty nester …. Some people must learn how to relax. Unfortunately, some resist that!

      Like

    1. Dan,
      Isn’t it interesting how some in retirement say they are busier now than when they were working. I understand the point, but I have a difficult time buying that. However, keeping busy is one of the keys to retirement – and keeping busy naturally involves rush. Then again, retirement rush is also different that working-years rush. Cheers to you staying busy.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I seldom rush anymore. The older one gets, the more they take things easy. The younger generations are absolutely wearing themselves out – They even talk twice as fast as I do. Ha Lovely music – do love the guitar. My husband has several guitars and we use to sing along around the campfire as he played a few tunes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Peggy,
      Life is more hectic than ever. Personally, I’m glad I’m not 30 because their work life is very demanding – especially as organizations demand more with less. Glad you enjoyed the guitar music. Cheers to the joy hubby gets when playing. I hope you showed him the video! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I will let my husband listen to the video. He has played similiar music, which he created himself. Just a hobby for him. Yes, the younger generattion is in high speed mode – very tiring indeed.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. We do seem to live in an age of rushing–and rush hour extends much longer than it used to.
    I did actually get our first cell phones for emergencies–after our car broke down on a highway and my husband had to walk to find a payphone (which still existed then). And my mom’s family had a phone before many of their family members and friends because it was for my grandfather’s store.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Merril,
      No doubt that rush hour starts earlier and extends longer. Part of the reason is more people therefore more vehicles – but I think work demands also influence rush hour. Thanks for confirming my thoughts about the early days of cell phones – and mentioning payphones made me smile.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Being in a perpetual rush is something I always avoided. Rushing leads to mistakes. Especially in a medical/research setting. Granted there are moments that require quickness but the chaos of rushing without a plan can only make things worse. I would often quote Goofy to my students and co-workers, “Slow and steady, steady and slow, that’s the way we like to go.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Muri,
      No question that there are many situations when rushing serves as a detriment – thus leading to mistakes. Then again, I also think of the busy ER because rushing is so much the norm. The ER folks have to be highly skilled at rushing and being focused and rational – all while multi-tasking! Cheers to Goofy being quite the philosopher!

      Like

  8. Excellent article Frank… there isn’t a rush in me these days Lol…
    And oh to the days we would travel miles and not carry a cell phone.. because they weren’t yet invented..
    And worry not about breaking down, or getting lost.. 🙂
    Here’s to MIND, BODY, and SOUL….. as we enjoy the MOMENT.. 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  9. As you can see, I did not rush to make a comment after I liked this post.
    I like sewing by hand, because it can’t be rushed. It’s needle in, needle out…. over and over. It’s quite Zen.
    I do enjoy good food with wine, also.
    Of course when I saw the topic “Rush”, I thought of the band “Rush”. Not my fave band, but I do like this one song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyhW2v0NDM0x

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Resa,
      You are an artist – and artist like to take their time – especially to get it right! Cheers to the fact that the creative process is zen for you! Thanks for including Rush, the band. They are quite the artists – and I also like that song! Cheers to you tasting for food and wine. Clink!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Excellent post Frank. Technology was supposed to help us work less but the opposite is true. My grown children seem to be always “available” through email and cell phones. And I love the video called Spanish Romance. Very soothing.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. First, thanks for the link. I had to check to see what the photo was. 😉. Technology has made rushing an everyday thing. The question is what do we do to slow down? Walking on the beach or in nature is a great choice. Writing actually letters or cards and then waiting for a snail mail response is another…and everyone likes real mail. Leave a little earlier and take the scenic route. Venture out without your home or leave it in your pocket/purse with it muted while with friends. Have dinner with friends with everyone bringing a dish and don’t allow phones. Walk somewhere instead of driving if possible. Sit somewhere and just relax without anything to look at except what’s in front of you. Be mindful of what you’re doing even if watching TV and just do that one thing!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. It took us quite a long time to leave “rushing” behind when we retired but it was and still is the most welcome part of having left what everyone calls the “rat race”. We really no longer rush – if we’re late for something, so what. A few minutes isn’t going to hurt….. I sat here while writing this comment and tried very hard to think of just one thing that I still rush into or out of or for and couldn’t. But if I try, I can totally remember that feeling in the pit of my stomach when I HAD to rush for some reason – I don’t miss it one bit.

    Pam

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Frank, I think one of the blessings Nature offers us is an opportunity to slow down a bit and enjoy the present. Do we all rush about like ants whose home has been disturbed? Of course, but it’s not good for us — our health or our peace of mind. Our world today is so hectic! Cherish the times when we take a few deep breaths and calm our ragged nerves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Debbie,
      Great point. Nature serves as a good model for us to learn time management. Nature doesn’t rush – and it does fine. I agree – rushing is not good for us – not good physically, mentally, spiritually, intellectually, and any other segment of life I left out. Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I think I adopted the rush rush mentality as a junior nurse with a huge workload. I didn’t stick with Nursing but that rush rush mentality took its time to leave me. Now I see it all around – as you point out, the communications age has meant disruption from sustained concentration and distraction. I don’t think it is a healthy approach to our life. But it is all around. Retirement gives me the flexibility to answer phones, messages emails promptly, but mostly I do it at a dedicated time. I hate being tired to the phone! It is one of the great things about ageing, you forget where you leave your phone – and thus enjoy some quiet away from the notifications!
    Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Amanda,
      Thanks for sharing a bit of perspective through your experience. To me, the hospital ER and the cell phone emphasize different aspects of rush. After all, the ER is vital to a person’s being. The phone also symbolizes the immediacy of today’s society. Although our phone is very much part of each of us, plus we feel a bit unsettled when we forget it, being without it is a welcome respit. I mainly keep my phone on vibrate to decrease its annoyance.

      Like

  15. Thanks for this, Frank. I do think that rushing is the bane of modern society. It leads to shoddy work and sloppy thinking. Also to missing what is truly important in life in favor of short-term gratification.

    I do like to be on time, so I leave early. That is the opposite of rushing.

    I was thinking recently about how long the 70s were. I only remember about a third of the 60s. The 80s were pretty slow, but the facades since have whizzed by in a huge rush!!! How dat happen?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Eileen,
      Thanks for your opening paragraph because (for me) you stated so much in your few sentences, which supported this essay so much! In terms of your comparison of the decades, well … I think part of it has to do with age. The lives of youth are in anticipation of something whereas adult life focuses on deadlines – thus the feeling of rushing to get something done. So anticipation and rush perceive time differently. Just a thought. Thanks for sharing and walking along.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Very interesting topic Frank – glad you strayed from your list of ideas! Like you, as a retired person I am happy to leave behind the years of rushing required in my previous life. How is it that jobs turn otherwise normal people into rushing maniacs?!?!?! Like you, I love my walks on the beach and I treasure every peaceful moment they offer me. The few times I have to rush in my current life I truly resent it and don’t get me started on traffic which I’ve long left behind but must occasionally face. The good news about having to rush now and then is that it makes us truly appreciate a life without it!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tina,
      Glad you enjoyed the unexpected topic. I may have written it this past snowbird season (but I’m not sure). An interesting contradiction of writing about rush while I’m relaxing at the beach. Meanwhile, I certainly don’t miss the rush mood of the work years. No way! Cheers to the peacefulness you find in Kiawah. 🙂

      Like

  17. As I’m reading your post my head is nodding and I’m smiling. This is so true! And as is with so many of your posts I started to ponder and then my pondering turned into wondering and then I thought this is far too long a conversation for a comment. So please bear with me. I apologize for commenting several days after the fact but my mind has been a churning…

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Frank, the pace many are trying to keep up with is simply unsustainable. Advances in technology were supposed to make life easier, weren’t they? Attention-to-detail is a departing skill set, in part because so many are just going too fast. I do enjoy visiting “the fast lane” on occasion…but I don’t want to live there!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Bruce,
      An unsustainable pace is the cause of many disasters – personal & professional. No doubt in my mind! Technology definitely has hastened our pace – then again – much of that is by choice. Bottom line is that managing everything is more important than ever. Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. First off, I love that piece of music. It just calls us to stop and listen.
    You have reminded me of a situation we observed at Costco quite a few years ago. A woman pulls her cellphone from her ear and in disgust says to her husband: can you believe she doesn’t have call waiting? Who in their right mind does not have call waiting? She was beside herself.
    When I had a landline, I refused to get it. I wish I could remove it from my cellphone, too. I loathe being put on hold (especially when they forget they were speaking to me first…)
    I love that Resa sews by hand.
    It says much for today’s society when we have to force ourselves to not rush. It’s no longer the first state to be in. Sigh… As I look at the time and realise I have spent too much time on my computer and now must rush to the designer’s!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dale,
      Cheers to your love for the music. I think the first time I recall hearing that piece, we were having an outdoor dinner within the walls of Quebec City. Under the trees along a walking street looking up at the Frontenac … wonderful. There are better versions of this song, but they didn’t have the visuals as this one. I’m with you on call waiting as we didn’t have it either in the landline days. Meanwhile, life has us fighting the rush tendency – so let’s keep up the resistance. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. What a wonderful memory. There are so many versions of this piece, true.
        I just stopped off at my father’s widow’s house – haven’t seen her in ages and she just got herself a cellphone a couple weeks ago. However, she refuses to bring it with her on walks and such (I told her I could never since I take so many pictures). But I love that she refuses to be on call at all times. Hmmm… something to think about.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I like your review of how the phone has changed our lives and for most of us added periods of urgency that is hard to deny. I do my best to resist the “tyranny of the urgent” and slow down, avoiding that feeling of being rushed. Sometimes my best leaves me in a lurch. 🙂 I think we all need more time at the beach. I’m never rushed there.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Interesting thing about living with depression (Yes, there are many interesting facets) is one I didn’t really think about until I was well into adulthood. I used to want to rush through everything. And I do mean everything. Birthdays, parties, movies I had waited with anticipation for, and big games, great meals . . yes, everything. The reason was simple. I wasn’t feeling the super fantastic stuff everyone around me felt at these events. I simply felt, well, the same way I always felt. Hence the need to rush through these events, lest I felt even more depressed.

    I’ve worked on slowing things down. It’s a continuous process. Certain things do supply enjoyment. Like food, which I always go slow with- in the creating and enjoying. Running, this too. I want it to last. Meditation and exercising of any kind. But no, not baseball games. I still want to rush through those, seeing as how the average game lasts over three hours. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Rush has become the hamster wheel of life lately. Your post was a reminder to take it easy, stop trying to control things and move at a pace that is better suited to healthful living rather than stressed out existence. Peace, Frank. ☮️

    Like

  23. It is an interesting thing that this world gets faster and faster as we grow…and then proceeds to slow us right down as we get old so we can then ponder it all. All of our lives building, building, building to only turn around and start reducing until that all is left is ‘us’…but, hopefully, happy to be there. Great post Frank, may your strolls talk to you in that ‘let go’ in retirement 😀 ❤️ 🙏🏽 🦋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mark,
      Welcome first-time commenter to the sands of my cyberbeach. I’ve got the feeling you came over from Pam’s. Again, welcome and thank you for stopping by to sharing your thoughts. I like the way you mentioned life as a time of building, yet at retirement, we start reducing. During those building years we were possibly anticipating something bigger and better. So odd that reducing seems to be counterproductive to that thought … but I understand you point. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes indeed, Pam’s place has all these great people cruising around her castle so your link tempted me to come for a stroll and hear the sound of your surf.
        And it is in doing all that rushing around and building that we realize that the love and happiness we were looking for wasn’t ‘out there’ at all…but sitting inside waiting for us to look inside to what we had built in there instead. But…it takes one to know the other…and then just let it all go with a stroll on the beach with what we’ve finally found…’us’. Thank you for sharing kind sir 😀 ❤️ 🙏🏽 🦋

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Pam is a treat. I adore her sense of humor and the fact she’s a thinker. She’s a long-time visitor for me here. Meanwhile, my walks started about 6 years ago, but on another blog. Once I stopped posting there (after 11+ years), I reappeared here. I invite you to read the first walk that introduces this blog. https://beachwalkreflections.wordpress.com/2020/10/20/1-introducing/ … The About page also adds to my story. WIth all the walks (now 140), I try to maintain the same tone while stimulating thoughts. I’ll be visiting your blog soon! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I tried to leave a comment on that post and like many other blogs it wouldn’t let me. I get stopped in many places, it isn’t time for me to speak…but…I’ll try to sneak it in here 😀
            A gift to listen to the shore, it allows you to hear its heart, then speak it. A great share, thank you kind sir ❤️ 🙏🏽 🦋

            Liked by 1 person

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